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RAPID STEREOLITHOGRAPHY MOLDS

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000006397D
Original Publication Date: 1992-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2001-Dec-31
Document File: 1 page(s) / 53K

Publishing Venue

Motorola

Related People

Jim Tobin: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

StereoLithogrpahy has become widely used on- campus as a means of rapidly producing plastic parts from CAD databases. Often, these parts are used in sub- sequent operations, one of the most common of which is as a master for making a mold. In such a process, a material lie silicone is poured around the plastic part. Upon hardening, the plastic part is removed and the resulting cavity in the silicone is the cavity into which liquid plastic can be poured to produce multiple copies of the original. Although quicker than conventional pro- totype mold-making operations, this process requires two steps. Further, the mold-making step is considered more of an art than a science. Both of these limitations can be overcome by producing the mold directly using StereoLithography.

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MOTOROLA INC. Technical Developments +olume 15 May 1992

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RAPID STEREOLITHOGRAPHY MOLDS

by Jim Tobin, Chris Schneider, Bob Pennisi and Stevb Hunt

  StereoLithogrpahy has become widely used on- campus as a means of rapidly producing plastic parts from CAD databases. Often, these parts are used in sub- sequent operations, one of the most common of which is as a master for making a mold. In such a process, a material lie silicone is poured around the plastic part. Upon hardening, the plastic part is removed and the resulting cavity in the silicone is the cavity into which liquid plastic can be poured to produce multiple copies of the original. Although quicker than conventional pro- totype mold-making operations, this process requires two steps. Further, the mold-making step is considered more of an art than a science. Both of these limitations can be overcome by producing the mold directly using StereoLithography.

  The procedure to accomplish this is straightforward- produce a solid CAD model of the part desired from the mold using an advanced CAD tool such as Pro/

Engineer. Then, 'subtract'/the solid part from a solid block, the shape of the ultimate mold base, within the CAD tool. This operation iesults in a solid block with a cavity in the shape of the &t to be molded. The foal step is to 'cut' the databak into two halves, with the 'cut' occurring at the point! where the mold parting line is to be. The two halves &e then prepared for Stereo- Lithography and bui...