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CT2 BASE STATION LOCATION ID

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000006405D
Original Publication Date: 1992-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2002-Jan-01
Document File: 1 page(s) / 50K

Publishing Venue

Motorola

Related People

Michael Brad Spring: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

In order for the user to recognize where the base station is located, this in+ntion starts sending a mes- sage from the base to thd handset which contains the address or ID for that basd~atler authentication has been successfully completed. The message can be sent auto- matically upon registratioh or by entering a manufac- turer specific key sequehce which will request this information from the base. $'he message can be displayed in a visual form on the di$ay (which will depend upon the type of display. The dieplay type information for the handset is always sent to y base during registration in a codeword called TERM-CAP), or as audio via a voice prompt through the earpie'~.

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MOTOROLA INC. Technical Developments volume 15 May 1992

CT2 BASE STATION LOCATION ID ~;

by Michael Brad Spring, David Heeschen and Mark Stuglik

1;

  In order for the user to recognize where the base station is located, this in+ntion starts sending a mes- sage from the base to thd handset which contains the address or ID for that basd~atler authentication has been successfully completed. The message can be sent auto- matically upon registratioh or by entering a manufac- turer specific key sequehce which will request this information from the base. $'he message can be displayed in a visual form on the di$ay (which will depend upon the type of display. The dieplay type information for the handset is always sent to y base during registration in a codeword called TERM-CAP), or as audio via a voice prompt through the earpie'~.

  In a CT2 public environment, CT2 base stations are strategicauy located in order to provide optimum cowxage over a given area. When a user establishes a lii with a public base, he/she is not aware of the exact location of that particular base. Since CT2 is a semi-mobile system, the user is very likely to move away from that base, thus causing poor link conditions and/or link failure.

  To resolve the problem, it would be beneficial to know the location of the public base station the handset is currently in communications with. If the user was to know the address or ID of the base they are currently using, then they could position themselves at a...