Browse Prior Art Database

ELECTRICAL DEVICE FACILITATING AUTOMATED ASSEMBLY

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000006414D
Original Publication Date: 1992-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2002-Jan-01
Document File: 4 page(s) / 168K

Publishing Venue

Motorola

Related People

John Delianides: AUTHOR

Abstract

FIELD OF THE INVENTION This invention relates in general to the field of elec- trical devices having symmetrical electrical contacts, and more specitically to those devices which are designed for high volume automated assembly and repair.

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MOTOROLA INC. Technical Developments Volume 15 May 1992

ELECTRICAL DEVICE FAClLlTATlNd

AUTOMATED ASSEMBLY ~

by John Delianides

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

This invention relates in general to the field of elec-

trical devices having symmetrical electrical contacts, and more specitically to those devices which are designed for high volume automated assembly and repair.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

  With the advent of robotic assembly and modern manufacturing techniques, it is unfortunate that the shape and arrangement of many conventional electrical com- ponents precludes automatic assembly of many electrical devices within electronic products. The use of external contacts or external wires to electrically couple these com- ponents into a iinal product typically requires secondary

soldering operations which are typicaUy performed man- ually. It is especiaIly tiustrating when wires are used which must be held in place by hand during soldering.

  Even with robotic placement, those electrical devices that lend themselves to automated assembly must first be placed in containers in a common predefmed orien- tation. Regrettably, this additional step is often time con- suming and potentially a defect causing operation. Agaii, some secondary soldering steps typically are unavoida- ble following conventional practices. This reduces the time efficiency of the production process and ultimately increases product cost.

  Lastly, to repair such an electrical component device after assembly typically requires that at least two soldered connections be removed before the defective compo- nent can be removed from the product. The additional required steps are unfortunately time consuming and potentially hazardous both to the electrical component for repair and to the electronic product.

DESCRIPTION OF A PREFERRED EMBODIMENT

  Electronic products used for receiving and presenting messages (e.g. a selective call receiver), comprise many electrical components and are candidates for use with

0 MOtOrola inc. ,992

the present invention. Referring to FIG. 1, an electrical component 100, accordind to one embodiment of the present invention, comprises a substantially cylindrical housing 102 and at least two,conductive bands 104. These bands are electrically isolaied from the outer surface of the housing 102 and from~~each other. In one embodi- ment, each conductive b&d 104 is capable of being electrically coupled to a ti&t and second electronic cir- cuits (not shown) via elect<cal contacts 106. These elec- trical contacts 106 may be mechanicalIy coupled to a printed circuit board 110 (or substrate) and electrically connected to the aforeme&ioned circuits using known soldering techniques such 4s at 108.

  With such an arranger$ent, automated assembly of the electrical component 100 is etlicient and substan- tially defect-free. Due to thk symmetry about the Z-axis, as well as a solderless assefnbly operation, the electrical component 100 quickly an'd effortlessly mates with...