Browse Prior Art Database

SEMI-VARIABLE FIXED KANJI MESSAGE ENTRY SYSTEM

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000006438D
Original Publication Date: 1992-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2002-Jan-03
Document File: 2 page(s) / 148K

Publishing Venue

Motorola

Related People

Robert Dana Lloyd: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

The transmission of Kanji messages provides an advantage to the Paging and other data message Mar- kets in the Orient by: 1. sending messages that are in a familiar form to the users, 2. reducing the air time required to send messages since a single Kanji character replaces 4 to 7 Kata- kana or romanji characters, 3. allowing longer messages to be displayed on a pager's display screen due to the character reduc- tion just described above.

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MOTOROLA INC. Technical Developments Volume 15 May 1992

SEMI-VARIABLE FIXED KANJI MESSAGE ENTRY SYSTEM

by Robert Dana Lloyd and Ying-Yueh Chang

  The transmission of Kanji messages provides an advantage to the Paging and other data message Mar- kets in the Orient by:

1. sending messages that are in a familiar form to the users,

2. reducing the air time required to send messages since a single Kanji character replaces 4 to 7 Kata- kana or romanji characters,

3. allowing longer messages to be displayed on a pager's display screen due to the character reduc- tion just described above.

  However, the major drawback to the use of custom Kanji messages at this time is in entering the Kanji mes- sages for transmission.

The generation of Kanji characters on a computer is currently done by one of three methods:

a. a keyboard with over 2,000 keys (each key being about 5mm square); This requires the use of a push stick due to the size and close proximity of the keys, greatly strains the eyes of the operator; and requires significant search time to find characters.

b. a so!Iware program in which a word is entered in Romanji or Kata-kana and the various corres- ponding Kanji characters are displayed (4-20 equivalent characters for each Romanji or Kata- kana word); The operator must then manually choose which ofthe Kanji characters is the appro- priate one for use in the context of the message. This process is repeated for each word of the mes- sage thus making Kanji message generation 3-5 times slower than Romanji or Kata-kana messages.

c. a computer scratch pad onto which the message is manually written in Kanji; the computer then

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scans the entry and converts the message into standard Kanji characters (ii the handwriting is recognizable). This method has not been popular due to the cost of the scratch pad, the need for a computer with larger memory, data recognition problems, and the need to manually write the mes- sage in Kanji.

  Consequently, the desire of customers to receive cus- tom messages in Kanji has not been achieved due to these data entry problems which would require the ser- vice company to charge more for the work involved. Thus, the only Kanji service widely available at this time in Japan is canned messages stored within the pager that do not provide any customization.

  In order to provide users with customized Kanji mes- sages at a low cost, semi-variable lixed messages would be used. The most common messages would be identi- tied and each broken into fvted phrases and variable data. These messages would then be stored in a com- puter (not pager) with tab insert locations into which variable data could be entered. Example: "The A mee...