Browse Prior Art Database

ULTRAVIOLET CURE MOLD

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000006470D
Original Publication Date: 1992-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2002-Jan-07
Document File: 2 page(s) / 85K

Publishing Venue

Motorola

Related People

James Tobin: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

The application of StereoLithography to rapidly pro- duce models has received considerable attention in the Land Mobile Products Sector during the past year. While these models have been excellent representations to eval- uate form, the brittleness of the material used in the Stereolithography Apparatus (SLA) reduces the use- fulness of models for evaluating fit and function. The models crack and break without gentle handling.

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MOTOROLA INC. Technical Developments Volume 15 May 1992

ULTRAVIOLET CURE MOLD

by James Tobin, Robert Pennisi, Susan Nesselroth and Steve Hunt

  The application of StereoLithography to rapidly pro- duce models has received considerable attention in the Land Mobile Products Sector during the past year. While these models have been excellent representations to eval- uate form, the brittleness of the material used in the Stereolithography Apparatus (SLA) reduces the use- fulness of models for evaluating fit and function. The models crack and break without gentle handling.

  While there are other resin systems available for application in the SLA, there is currently little mechani- cal property data published on their moduli, glass tran- sition temperatures and impact strength. Changing resins in the SLA is a long and tedious task and requires recalibration of the SLA operating parameters. This makes evaluation of alternative resins a diflicult and unde sirable process.

  This invention overcomes these problems by pro- viding an alternative method to produce ASTM test spec- imens of these UV-cured polymers without using the SLA. Traditional molds are made from metals such as stainless steel and aluminum, or highly ffied epoxies. These materials are not transparent to the UV light needed to cure the photopolymers used in the SLA. In this invention a mold base is made from polypropylene.

Polypropylene and high density, high molecular weight polyethylene are unique in! tha...