Browse Prior Art Database

TRANSMIT/RECEIVE INDICATOR IN BACKLIT LCD

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000006472D
Original Publication Date: 1992-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2002-Jan-07
Document File: 1 page(s) / 63K

Publishing Venue

Motorola

Related People

William Mark Bradford: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Motorola portable and mobile communications prod- ucts typically have a transmit/receive indicator. Many products have bi-color Light Emitting Diode's (LED's) which are normally off, but glow red on transmit and green on receive.

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MOTOROLA INC. Technical Developments Volume 15

May 1992

TRANSMIT/RECEIVE INDICATOR IN BACKLIT LCD

by William Mark Bradford and Peter Bradford Gilmore

  Motorola portable and mobile communications prod- ucts typically have a transmit/receive indicator. Many products have bi-color Light Emitting Diode's (LED's) which are normally off, but glow red on transmit and green on receive.

   Control s&faces of portable products are becoming more and more crowded with critical customer features. The invention reduces the visual clutter of distinct items on the top of the radio, while retaining full function to the user. Liquid Crystal Displays (LCD's) are now com- mon on portable products. These displays are typically back-lit via one or more discrete LED's to allow the display to be used in the dark. The invention uses these back-light LED's as a transmit/receive indicator.

  In a typical implementation, a portable radio with a top LCD would have four bi-color LED's surrounding a light-pipe to provide illumination for the LCD. These LED's are normally off. When the radio goes into trans- mit mode, one or more of the LED's would turn on and glow red. In receive mode, the LED would glow green. This red or green illumination would be guided by the light-pipe, and the LCD viewing window would glow with the appropriate color. The brightness could be con- trolled by the number of LED's turned on simultaneously. Normal back-lighting would occur by turning on the

LED's in bi-color mode (...