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AUTO PHONE REDIAL IN AN RF ENVIRONMENT

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000006480D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2002-Jan-08
Document File: 4 page(s) / 167K

Publishing Venue

Motorola

Related People

Ron M. Minkoff: AUTHOR

Abstract

Use of telephone interconnect on a portable or mobile radio usually requires a lot of ergonomic inter- action. If the telephone call that the user places is busy because the phone on the other end is in use, it can be inconvenient for the radio user to constantly redial the phone line in an attempt to place the call. What would be convenient is to have a mechanism which will moni- tor the status of the phone line (by constantly redialing on its own) and alert the radio user when the phone call gets through.

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MOTOROLA INC. Technical Developments Volume 16 August 1992

AUTO PHONE REDIAL IN AN RF ENVIRONMENT

by Ron M. Minkoff

  Use of telephone interconnect on a portable or mobile radio usually requires a lot of ergonomic inter- action. If the telephone call that the user places is busy because the phone on the other end is in use, it can be inconvenient for the radio user to constantly redial the phone line in an attempt to place the call. What would be convenient is to have a mechanism which will moni- tor the status of the phone line (by constantly redialing on its own) and alert the radio user when the phone call gets through.

  There are two methods for performing auto phone redial in an RF environment. The method performed by the radio can be decided by a codeplug parameter.

METHOD 1 (Controller Redial Method):

  The radio user enters phone mode and sends a phone line access codeword to its base station controller (from hereon simply referred to as "controller"). The user dials the phone number; if the user hears an audio busy tone, he can then select the auto redial function. The function causes the radio to send a redial request codeword to the controller. The controller acknowledges the request. The radio will have a visual indication throughout the entire process that auto redial is active. At this time the user may choose to stay in phone mode or exit to nor- mal dispatch mode where the radio can perform its nor- mal functions during the redial process.

  The controller meanwhile is performing the redial task. The controller redials the number and waits for a busy or ring audio signal. If the phone line is busy the controller will hang up the line. Before reactivating the phone line, the controller will find out if a timeout time has elapsed. If so, then the controller will send a codeword back to the radio telling it that the redial retries have failed and will stop its redial attempts. The radio will give visual and audio indications to the user that the controller failed. If the timeout time has not elapsed, the controller will reactivate the phone line and redial. This sequence will continue until a ring signal is detected. When this signal is detected, the controller will send a

0 MOtOrola. Inc. 1992

success call-back codeword to the radio. The user can then re-enter phone mode, get connected to the phone lie and begin the conversation when the other end picks up the phone.

  While the radio is waiting for the controller to send back a failure or call-back codeword, it is possible that the radio can go out of range or the controller can become inoperable. In either case the radio will not receive the failure or call-back codeword. Therefore the radio will have its own timeout timer for receiving the status codeword of the redial process. This amount of time will typically be 5-30 minutes or more. If the radio does not receive an auto redial status codeword within this time, it will assume the controller failed and will no longer wai...