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A PROCEDURE FOR SIGNALING BUSY PERIODS

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000006482D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2002-Jan-08
Document File: 4 page(s) / 140K

Publishing Venue

Motorola

Related People

Arthur D. Chrapkowski: AUTHOR

Abstract

In a trunked radio system, a user attempts to initiate a conversation by making a channel request. If a channel is available at each site to be involved in the call, the trunking system assigns channels to the call, and the user is electron- ically notified that he or she may begin the conversation. If enough channels are not available, the user is not&d that he is queued for later service. With current technology, the user is informed that insutlicient channels are available only r&r he or she initiates the call attempt. The invention pro- posed here is a procedure for keeping users informed of current busy periods for their talkgroups. These are periods when insuff%zient channels are available to support a dis- patch call from a talkgroup. Using this new information, users can choose to make calls when they are less likely to be queued. This promotes more efficient use of the trunk- ing system because fewer channel requests are queued, and more calls are made when channels are available.

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MOTOROLA INC. Technical Developments Volume 16 August 1992

A PROCEDURE FOR SIGNALING BUSY PERIODS

by Arthur D. Chrapkowski

ABSTRACT

  In a trunked radio system, a user attempts to initiate a conversation by making a channel request. If a channel is available at each site to be involved in the call, the trunking system assigns channels to the call, and the user is electron- ically notified that he or she may begin the conversation. If enough channels are not available, the user is not&d that he is queued for later service. With current technology, the user is informed that insutlicient channels are available only r&r he or she initiates the call attempt. The invention pro- posed here is a procedure for keeping users informed of current busy periods for their talkgroups. These are periods when insuff%zient channels are available to support a dis- patch call from a talkgroup. Using this new information, users can choose to make calls when they are less likely to be queued. This promotes more efficient use of the trunk- ing system because fewer channel requests are queued, and more calls are made when channels are available.

DETAILS

  The invention informs each unit that in the very recent past there have not been enough voice channels to support dispatch calls for the unit's talkgroup. This information is conveyed to the unit through an elec- tronic signal. The precise nature of this signal is arbi- trary. The implementation suggested here is a light on each radio. When the light is bright, it represents a poten- tial busy signal. Any dispatch call initiation made when the light is bright will likely result in a busy tone and a queued request for service. Conversely, a dim light rep- resents a potential non-busy (that is, grant) signal. A dispatch call initiated when the signal light is dim has a good chance of being granted immediate service.

  The potential busy or non-busy (bright or dim) sig- nal sent by the trunking system to the unit is revised every so often. How often is arbitrary, but a shorter time between revisions corresponds to greater reporting accu- racy. An interval of a few seconds or several seconds between revisions is suggested here.

  The signal that is sent to units is determined separately for each talkgroup. Each unit in a talkgroup receives the same potential busy or non-busy signal. Although sig- nal determination need not be done at the same time for all talkgroups, it is convenient to do so, and that is the approach presented here.

  Radios are initialized to a non-busy (dii light) status, and each signal sent out to them is really a signal revision since no signal is sent unless the signal status of the radio is to change. For that reason, a new signal status is deter- mined during each revision inte...