Browse Prior Art Database

IMPROVED RELIABILITY MOBILE FACSIMILE SYSTEM

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000006499D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2002-Jan-09
Document File: 1 page(s) / 52K

Publishing Venue

Motorola

Related People

Tim McCarthy: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

The ability to transmit facsimilies of original docu- ments over the Public Switched Telephone Network (F'STN) has become widely available. Extending this capa- bility to mobile and portable applications via two-way radio is currently possible but not as widely available. A typical mobile facsimile system is shown in Figures 1 and 2. As shown in Figure 1, a land fax machine is connected to a radio station via a circuit in the PSTN. The radio station can then connect the land fax circuit to a mobile or portable fax machine via a radio frequency carrier. The mobile fax machine is commonly connected to the mobile radio tram- ceiver via an adapter box that acts as a Y connector behvem the transceiver and handset as shown in Figure 1.

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MOTOROLA INC. Technical Developments Volume 16 August 1992

IMPROVED RELIABILITY MOBILE FACSIMILE SYSTEM

by Tim McCarthy and Edward Laves

  The ability to transmit facsimilies of original docu- ments over the Public Switched Telephone Network (F'STN) has become widely available. Extending this capa- bility to mobile and portable applications via two-way radio is currently possible but not as widely available. A typical mobile facsimile system is shown in Figures 1 and 2. As shown in Figure 1, a land fax machine is connected to a radio station via a circuit in the PSTN. The radio station can then connect the land fax circuit to a mobile or portable fax machine via a radio frequency carrier. The mobile fax machine is commonly connected to the mobile radio tram- ceiver via an adapter box that acts as a Y connector behvem the transceiver and handset as shown in Figure 1.

This invention improves the reliability of mobile fac- simile systems in three ways:

1. A signal strength indicator in the radio controls an indicator light on the handset that tells the

mobile user when the radio signal is strong enough to ensure reliable fax transmission.

2. The use of coded messages over the radio channel allows the mobile user and land user to exchange signals prior to the attempt to send a fax. For example, the land user can send a "ready to send a fax" signal, alerting the mobile user to pull off the road when the radio signal strength indicator is on. The mobile user can reply wi...