Browse Prior Art Database

BYPASSED VIBRATIONAL ALERT BASED UPON SYSTEM RESPONSE

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000006514D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2002-Jan-11
Document File: 2 page(s) / 73K

Publishing Venue

Motorola

Related People

Daniel P. Troutman: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Increasing numbers of pager users rely on silent alert features to recognize that a page has been received. These silent alerting systems most commonly rely on the prin- ciple of rotating imbalance to develop the force that is sensed by the pager wearer. If the pager is attached to a loosely fitted article of clothing, it is possible that during a silent alert the vibrational forces will not be of suffi- cient amplitude to be sensed through this "loose con- nection" to the wearer. In this case, to insure that the incoming page is recognized, a backup method of alerting is required. The invention described herein utilizes the pager's microcontroller to activate the transducer (audio alert) thereby effecting the backup alert.

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MOTOROLA INC. Technical Developments Volume 16 August 1992

BYPASSED VIBRATIONAL ALERT BASED UPON SYSTEM RESPONSE

by Daniel Ft. Troutman, Raju Karingattil, and Henry Wandt

  Increasing numbers of pager users rely on silent alert features to recognize that a page has been received. These silent alerting systems most commonly rely on the prin- ciple of rotating imbalance to develop the force that is sensed by the pager wearer. If the pager is attached to a loosely fitted article of clothing, it is possible that during a silent alert the vibrational forces will not be of suffi- cient amplitude to be sensed through this "loose con- nection" to the wearer. In this case, to insure that the incoming page is recognized, a backup method of alerting is required. The invention described herein utilizes the pager's microcontroller to activate the transducer (audio alert) thereby effecting the backup alert.

The operation of the invention is illustrated by the flowchart of Figure 1. First, when a page is received and

the radio is set to vibrational (silent) alert, the microcontrol- ler activates the vibrator. During this activation a meas- urement of the current drain on the motor is determined and compared to a set level of acceptability. This level of acceptability is based upon the knowledge of the micromotor's response to various levels of system stiffness. For example, when the pager is carried in a pocket or otherwise loosely attached to the user, and the silent alert i...