Browse Prior Art Database

COMMON PAGING TERMINAL DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM (CPTDS)

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000006534D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2002-Jan-11
Document File: 2 page(s) / 136K

Publishing Venue

Motorola

Related People

Bradley A. Murray: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Present paging systems are based on providing serv- ice 1ocaUy (citywide or private), regionally, statewide or for a few service operators a nationwide offering for its subscrii. International covemge will some day be avail- able as well. Unfortunately, for the callers of the desired subscriber, current systems do present a logistics prob- lem in that they may not know to which paging opera- tion to place a call to insure a message will quickly and reliably reach the desired pager. In some cases a locally placed call may have one access number while a long distance call may enjoy the privileges of an (800) num- ber to gain access to the paging system. In either case, a variety of numbers must be remembered or catalogued so that the caller knows where and how to reach their party. It would therefore be advantageous to establish a centralized access means to allow a common paging ter- minal distribution system (CF'TDS) to be established that will simplify the requirements to place a call to any subscriber to a given paging setice.

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MOTOROLA INC. Technical Developments Volume 16 August 1992

COMMON PAGING TERMINAL DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM (CPTDS)

by Bradley A. Murray and William Kuznicki

  Present paging systems are based on providing serv- ice 1ocaUy (citywide or private), regionally, statewide or for a few service operators a nationwide offering for its subscrii. International covemge will some day be avail- able as well. Unfortunately, for the callers of the desired subscriber, current systems do present a logistics prob- lem in that they may not know to which paging opera- tion to place a call to insure a message will quickly and reliably reach the desired pager. In some cases a locally placed call may have one access number while a long distance call may enjoy the privileges of an (800) num- ber to gain access to the paging system. In either case, a variety of numbers must be remembered or catalogued so that the caller knows where and how to reach their party. It would therefore be advantageous to establish a centralized access means to allow a common paging ter- minal distribution system (CF'TDS) to be established that will simplify the requirements to place a call to any subscriber to a given paging setice.

  The establishment of a common paging terminal dis- tribution means follows four common elements quite familiar to today's population:

The consolidated access numbers utilized by the tel- ephone companies to allow the consumer to readily obtain information or easy help, aid or assistance:

411~Information Locally (Area Code) 555-1212 Gives Long Distance

Information (800)-Free access to a Service/System

Subscriber 911-Emergency Contacts

A social security number is uniquely assigned to an individual and is utiliied for broad assortment of identification:

Social Security Benefits Internal Revenue Service Health Services Identification Number Student Identification Number (Elementary

School through College) Employee Identification

The post office zip code determines where a person resides or works consists of 5 to 9 numbers depending on the accuracy desired.

The area code system established by the phone sys- tem covers a specitic region of the continental U.S. and for the international scene country codes have been established.

  Figure 1 shows how the CFI'DS service is connected to (x) number of dierent paging systems via standard phone routes. AU incoming calls using the common phone number are routed to the CmDS for distribu- tion to the appropriate paging system. Figure 2 is a more detailed drawing of the CFTDS service. Incoming calls are received by the incoming call modem. When a pager number is entered by a caller, the CPU (Central Processing Unit) compares this number to the numbers in the pager number memory to obtain the correct subscribers "file:' The "tile" memory contains the infor- mation pertaining to the subscribers pager system (i.e. paging system phone number, local or nationwide sys- tem, Zip code, etc.). The menu that is to be presented to t...