Browse Prior Art Database

MULTIPURPOSE VOLUME CONTROL

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000006555D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2002-Jan-14
Document File: 1 page(s) / 53K

Publishing Venue

Motorola

Related People

Mike Bishop: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

This invention allows radio users and service per- sonnel to make in-the-field adjustments to a controlled set of radio parameters without the use of a domputer. Examples of such radio parameters might include squelch, display contrast, RF power, deviation, and min- imum and maximum volume settings. The adjustment of certain parameters (power, deviation etc.) would only be made available to qualiied service personnel to pre- vent possible FCC violations. It is suggested that this be achieved through the use of a hardware "key" that could be attached to the side connector. Only when this key was attached would g parameters be accessible for adjustment.

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MOTOROLA INC. Technical Developments Volume 16 August 1992

MULTIPURPOSE VOLUME CONTROL

by Mike Bishop, Randy Fraser and Gilbert Werner

  This invention allows radio users and service per- sonnel to make in-the-field adjustments to a controlled set of radio parameters without the use of a domputer. Examples of such radio parameters might include squelch, display contrast, RF power, deviation, and min- imum and maximum volume settings. The adjustment of certain parameters (power, deviation etc.) would only be made available to qualiied service personnel to pre- vent possible FCC violations. It is suggested that this be achieved through the use of a hardware "key" that could be attached to the side connector. Only when this key was attached would g parameters be accessible for adjustment.

  The invention uses the fact that the volume control potentiometer is directly connected to the radio's microprocessor. This means it can be reconfigured to

be a general purpose control. The radio is first placed into a "tune" mode of operation and the parameter to be adjusted is selected. This is accomplished by means of the radio display and keypad/radio controls. The poten- tiometer is then adjusted as required and the output volt- age is applied to an analog to digital converter resident in the radio's microprocessor. The microprocessor reads the result from the A/D converter and uses it to access a look-up table. The contents of the look-up table are preprogrammed with data that...