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INTERLOCK METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR WRIST WORN TWO-WAY RADIO TRANSCEIVERS

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000006559D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2002-Jan-15
Document File: 1 page(s) / 48K

Publishing Venue

Motorola

Related People

Timothy A. Grothause: AUTHOR

Abstract

Improvements in miniaturization have made two- way radios so small that they may be packaged in the form of a wrist watch. Such small packaging makes push- to-transmit methods awkward, if not impossible. Con- tinuous transmission of signals is detrimental to battery Iife and is a shameful waste of spectrum resources; sound activated transmissions are highly prone to unwanted transmissions due to extraneous environmental sounds. It is desirable to develop a method of signal transmis- sion activation which is complementary to the conveniece of wrist worn two-way radios and is conducive to proper operation of the unit.

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MOTOROLA /NC. Technical Developments Volume 16 August 1992

INTERLOCK Ml3HOD AND APPARATUS FOR WRIST WORN TWO-WAY RADIO TRANSCEIVERS

by Timothy A.. Grothause

  Improvements in miniaturization have made two- way radios so small that they may be packaged in the form of a wrist watch. Such small packaging makes push- to-transmit methods awkward, if not impossible. Con- tinuous transmission of signals is detrimental to battery Iife and is a shameful waste of spectrum resources; sound activated transmissions are highly prone to unwanted transmissions due to extraneous environmental sounds. It is desirable to develop a method of signal transmis- sion activation which is complementary to the conveniece of wrist worn two-way radios and is conducive to proper operation of the unit.

An iofra-red emission source could be located in a decorative housing, such as a tie tack or broach, worn

upon the front of the upper body. Its emissions would be focused to illuminate the area in front of the users face. This emission would then be sensed by the wrist worn two-way radio only when it is brought up in front of the users face. When sensed, it would enable voice- activated transmit circuitry, precluding the need to manually activate the transmitter, allowing "one-handed" operation. The patterned nature of the interlock radia- tion forces the user to place the unit directly in front of the face, ensuring that the microphone is optimally positioned for pick-up of the users voice, a...