Browse Prior Art Database

SENDER ACCESS CONTROL OF RECEIVED INFORMATION

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000006582D
Original Publication Date: 1992-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2002-Jan-16
Document File: 2 page(s) / 122K

Publishing Venue

Motorola

Related People

Greg Cannon: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

The following explains a method to enable the sender of information to have control over the access of the received information. Since a sender would know the sensitivity of the data better than the receiver, it is a more natural choice as a controller of the access of that data. This is an improvement over relying upon addresses and signaIling in the data receiver to make a decision upon data sensitivity. This is because all data that could arrive on the same address could have varying levels of sensitivity. Encrypting the transmission of a message is usually used to protect sensitive information but since a data receiver will usually decrypt the message before it is displayed, other levels of security must be implemented. Thus the use of message headers speciiically to control the access of information can effectively be applied to protect received messages.

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MOTOROLA INC. Technical Developments Volume 16 August 1992

SENDER ACCESS CONTROL OF RECEIVED INFORMATION

by Greg Cannon and Bill Macko

ABSTRACT

  The following explains a method to enable the sender of information to have control over the access of the received information. Since a sender would know the sensitivity of the data better than the receiver, it is a more natural choice as a controller of the access of that data. This is an improvement over relying upon addresses and signaIling in the data receiver to make a decision upon data sensitivity. This is because all data that could arrive on the same address could have varying levels of sensitivity. Encrypting the transmission of a message is usually used to protect sensitive information but since a data receiver will usually decrypt the message before it is displayed, other levels of security must be implemented. Thus the use of message headers speciiically to control the access of information can effectively be applied to protect received messages.

INTRODUCTION

  Information security is an issue in communications that continues to grow in importance as the reliance upon an information infrastructure grows. As more people subscribe to information services, and as more people use more economic means of transfening large amounts of information, it is inevitable that sensitive information will be transferred over public networks and received into accessible information stores. Sensitive data that is received in a device that will allow later examination of that data an unknown number of times can easily be compromised. If the receiver is stolen but is still func- tional, it can receive information that can then be stolen. A sender sends information over such a network blindly, without having any control over who would eventually receive that information. This technology would solve that problem, allowing the sender to add information control bits before the message specifically to control the access of thst information. These bits would control whether or not the pager would require a password to receive the message, whether the message would be locally encrypt&, whether the message would be deleted after its first reading, and whether the pager should beep

0 Motorola, Inc. 1992

for a particular message, and if so, how it should beep.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

  Data is transferred to the pager via known rf tech- nology. Part of the data would consist of some sort of header information, portions of which would include directives to the decoder to perform special operations after the page had been received. This method will allow some control over the interface between a computer and a data receiver, ensuring that reliable point to point com- munication is achieved. There are several of these spe- cial operations that we have envisioned. Message protection, target encryption, automatic delete, and silent message reception are all functions that could be con- trolled by information in the...