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Compliant Heat-Sink Attach Method for Substrate-Based Processors

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000006606D
Publication Date: 2002-Jan-16
Document File: 1 page(s) / 21K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Disclosed is a design for providing a more consistent spring force to hold the substrate and/or substrate cover to the heat sink. The disclosed design integrates two spring elements into the fan or heat-sink assembly. The two internal springs can be coil, leaf, or wire springs, as needed to meet functional requirements. The internal, integrated springs are significantly easier to assemble than traditional spring-clip assemblies.

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This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 65% of the total text.

Compliant Heat-Sink Attach Method for Substrate-Based Processors

For substrate-based processors, the substrate and/or substrate cover must be attached to a heat sink.  Currently, an external spring mechanism (a spring clip) is used to provide spring force and to hold the substrate and/or substrate cover to the fan’s heat sink.  However, the external spring mechanism does not always provide consistent bondline compression (spring force) after assembly.  In addition, current spring mechanisms can be difficult to assemble.

Disclosed is a design for providing a more consistent spring force to hold the substrate and/or substrate cover to the heat sink.  The disclosed design integrates two spring elements into the fan or heat-sink assembly.  The two internal springs can be coil, leaf, or wire springs, as needed to meet functional requirements.  The internal, integrated springs are significantly easier to assemble than traditional spring-clip assemblies.   

In the disclosed design, two spring mechanisms are integrated into the fan or heat-sink assembly.  The two springs are installed between the heat sink and fan shroud, as shown in FIG 1.  The substrate or substrate cover is then attached to the heat sink by four conventional rigid fasteners, such as screw pins.  The conventional rigid fasteners pass through the cover and/or substrate assembly.  The fasteners anchor to bosses that are molded into the fan or heat-sink shroud.

A second embodiment of the disclosed design is for passive heat sinks...