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On-Screen Source-Editor Distinction of Compiled Vs. Uncompiled Code

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000006607D
Publication Date: 2002-Jan-16
Document File: 2 page(s) / 14K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Disclosed is a method for on-screen source-editor distinction of compiled versus uncompiled code. With the disclosed method, when the source editor displays source code on the screen, compiled code is distinguished from uncompiled code by color or some other font change.

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On-Screen Source-Editor Distinction of Compiled Vs. Uncompiled Code

Integrated software development environments (IDE) typically integrate a text editor with several other features, including language sensitivity and debugger/compiler integration.  Debugger and/or compiler integration features include glyphs that decorate source lines that contain breakpoints.  For example, if a source line has a breakpoint on it, and execution begins, no code is generated for the source line.  Instead, the debugger communicates to the source editor the inconsistency between compiled and uncompiled code.  The source editor then changes the glyph to indicate that the breakpoint is disabled.  Language-sensitivity features might include changing the font color for reserved words or for areas of code that correspond to comments. 

However, IDE features do not currently include the ability to distinguish on-screen code that is compiled versus code that is not compiled.  Instead, today’s users must generate output from the preprocessor in order to find those lines which are compiled vs. the lines of code which were not compiled.  In some design environments, identifying and comparing compiled to uncompiled code is a manual and extremely difficult task.  In addition, header files often contain complicated preprocessor directives.  New users or readers of the source code usually cannot quickly calculate preprocessor directives while browsing the source code.

Disclosed is a method for on-screen source-editor distinction of compiled versus uncompiled code.  With the disclosed method, when the source editor displays source code on the screen, compiled code is distinguished from uncompiled code by color or some other font change. 

In the following example, there are two sections of code.  The first section is not compiled; the second section is compiled.  With the disclosed method, the source editor uses italics to distinguish the uncompiled code from code which has been compiled.

#if0

This_code_is_not_compiled_due_to_a_preprocessor_dirrective();

#else

This_code_is_compiled();

#endif

The following lines show another example of the disclosed method’s distinction of uncompiled versus compiled code.  In the following example, the uncompiled code is shown in italics.  However, the source editor could display the uncompiled code as grayed-out or otherwise distinguished from the compiled code.

if(0){

              This_code_is_not_compiled_due_to_a_constant_false_expressio...