Browse Prior Art Database

METHOD FOR BEST BASE SELECTION IN A MICROCELL SYSTEM

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000006743D
Original Publication Date: 1993-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2002-Jan-29
Document File: 3 page(s) / 102K

Publishing Venue

Motorola

Related People

Steve Shapiro: AUTHOR

Abstract

Microcell systems are currently operating in many countries around the globe. With the large amount of base stations distributed around cities, there are times when more than one base station is in range of a user. When the user tries to place a call in an environment where they are in range of more than one base station, there is no guarantee that the closest base station will be the one granting the link. If we take the current opera- tion of CT2-CA1 (Cordless Telephone Second Genera- tion with the Common Air Interface) as an example we iind that due to the CA1 scanning algorithm, the base station granting the link is merely the fust one receiving the handset's request. This station could be the one far- thest away. Should this station be on or near the "fringe" of the handsets RF coverage range, the user will experi- ence a poor Iiik due to the distance between the base station and handset. This is particularly disturbing ifthere are closer base stations with stronger RF signals which could have granted a link but did not.

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INC. Technical Developments Volume 18 March 1993

METHOD FOR BEST BASE SELECTION IN A MICROCELL SYSTEM

by Steve Shapiro

   Microcell systems are currently operating in many countries around the globe. With the large amount of base stations distributed around cities, there are times when more than one base station is in range of a user. When the user tries to place a call in an environment where they are in range of more than one base station, there is no guarantee that the closest base station will be the one granting the link. If we take the current opera- tion of CT2-CA1 (Cordless Telephone Second Genera- tion with the Common Air Interface) as an example we iind that due to the CA1 scanning algorithm, the base station granting the link is merely the fust one receiving the handset's request. This station could be the one far- thest away. Should this station be on or near the "fringe" of the handsets RF coverage range, the user will experi- ence a poor Iiik due to the distance between the base station and handset. This is particularly disturbing ifthere are closer base stations with stronger RF signals which could have granted a link but did not.

  When base stations are connected together through a real time central control system, the central controller can compare signal strength levels received by each base station t?om the users handset. However interconnecting thousands of base stations through a central controller is quite costly and may be prohibitive in certain sitoa- tions. Most microcell systems today do not intercon- nect to a central controller on a real time basis.

  The solution presented in this paper provides the inter-base station interconnect through RF means. This saves considerable cost in the netwo...