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IMPROVED MECHANICAL SHOCK PROTECTION FOR SHOCK SENSITIVE DEVICES

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000006744D
Original Publication Date: 1993-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2002-Jan-29
Document File: 2 page(s) / 95K

Publishing Venue

Motorola

Related People

Dave Ballis: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

As mechanical shock performance expectations increase in personal communication devices, improved methods of shock isolation are needed to satisfy these demands. Existing designs utilize boots or snubbers formed from butyl or silicone to enclose shock sensitive components (i.e.: quartz, ceramic components). This approach can cause the device to be compressed between PCBs, other components, and the boot itself possibly inducing mechanical damage. This new approach uti- lizes the same materials as before, however, air pockets with tiny air valves allow for additional shock protection.

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INC. Technical Developments Volume 18 March 1993

IMPROVED MECHANICAL SHOCK PROTECTION FOR SHOCK SENSITIVE DEVICES

by Dave Ballis and Tom Mueller

embedded in the material, lower mass is realized which also improves shock performance. Vents allow the air chambers to collapse to conform to the space require- ments. These vents are also designed to release the air upon impact thus providing "air pillow cushioning" sim- ilar to the concept of bubble wrap material. The main difference from bubble wrap to this design is that the air vents allow the chamber to re-inflate and be ready for the next impact while the bubbles in bubble wrap tend to pop losing their effectiveness.

Several proposed application examples of this new design are shown in the following Figures.

DESCRIPTION: SUMMARY:

  Current shock isolation techniques employ sleeves that tit over specific components, or snubbers that fit between PCB layers or housing/PCB interfaces. This new design has two important new features to reduce high and low frequency mechanical shocks: air cham- bers and air venting. Air chambers are placed inside the material providing boots/snubbers that conform to the space between components, PCB layers, etc. With air

ABSTRACT

  As mechanical shock performance expectations increase in personal communication devices, improved methods of shock isolation are needed to satisfy these demands. Existing designs utilize boots or snubbers formed from butyl or silicone to enclose shock sensitive components (i.e.: quartz, ceramic components). This approach can cause the device to be compressed...