Browse Prior Art Database

Method for a package bandwidth-boosting technique through plating bar design optimization

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000006841D
Publication Date: 2002-Feb-06
Document File: 4 page(s) / 67K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Disclosed is a method for a package bandwidth-boosting technique through plating bar design optimization. Benefits include improved signal quality, improved flexibility in package selection, and improved cost effectiveness.

This text was extracted from a Microsoft Word document.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 50% of the total text.

Method for a package bandwidth-boosting technique through plating bar design optimization

Disclosed is a method for a package bandwidth-boosting technique through plating bar design optimization. Benefits include improved signal quality, improved flexibility in package selection, and improved cost effectiveness.

Background

              High-speed signaling has become a requirement for all communications chips.

To be competitive, the cost of the product must be minimal. The major cost component of the product is the package in which the die is enclosed. Package technologies range from low-cost low-bandwidth packages (less than $1 each) to high-cost high-bandwidth packages (greater than $100 each). The best selection for an application depends on performance requirements. Package design optimization of the cheaper package technologies can extend the bandwidth of the package, enabling their use for high-speed applications.

              Conventional plating bars are artifacts of most industry-standard packaging technologies. The bars are used for plating the signal traces with conducting metal. These plating bars function like reflecting stubs, which distort high-speed signals and make them unusable (see Figure 1).

      Signaling specifications for high-speed interfaces are typically stringent, in the range of 20-100 ps (see Figure 2).

              The conventional configuration exhibits degraded rise/fall times. High-speed signaling specifications (defined as 20% to 80% of peak-to-peak signal) are not met (see Figure 3).

              Under conventional design circumstances, a high-speed signal undergoes ledging due to the plating bars that drastically slow down the rise and fall times of the signal. Signaling specifications break, forcing the chip into expensive packaging technologies that do not require plating bars (such as ceramic packages) to meet the specification.

Description

              The disclosed method includes plating bars that boost the impedance of the plating bars 3-4 times that of the differential sign...