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Method for a connector housing design compliant to printed circuit board warp

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000006854D
Publication Date: 2002-Feb-06
Document File: 3 page(s) / 19K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Disclosed is a method for a connector housing design compliant to printed circuit board (PCB) warp. Benefits include improved yield and improved quality.

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Method for a connector housing design compliant to printed circuit board warp

Disclosed is a method for aconnector housing design compliant to printed circuit board (PCB) warp. Benefits include improved yield and improved quality.

Background

      Long connectors, both surface mount (SMT) and through-hole mount (THM), require retention pins to hold the connector against the printed circuit board. These retention pins require excessive insertion force and can result in insertion-related defects. Without the retention features, the PCB warp (sag) forms a gap between the board and the connector. For SMT connectors, the result is open solder joint defects. For THM connectors, the result is the pins not fully penetrating the board (“lead not through”).

              Conventionally, long connectors (both SMT and THM) use retention pins to hold the connector against the PCB (see Figure 1). Unfortunately, the retention pins require excessive insertion force and can result in insertion-related defects, such as bent THM pins or unseated/lifted connector ends.

General description

              The disclosed method enables the connector to remain positioned against the PCB without the use of retention features. The connector body design enables long SMT or THM connectors to comply with the warp and sag in the PCB that occurs during reflow temperatures.

              The key elements include the removal or absence of connector housing material along the length of the top and bottom of the connector (see Figure 2). Between every lead is a groove or V-cut on the top and bottom of the connector, which decreases the rigidity of the connector body. During reflow temperatures, the groove/cut enables the connector to flex and comply with the shape of the printed circuit board.

Advantages

              The disclosed design presents several technical advantages, including:

•             The series of grooves on the top and bo...