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WATERPROOF PAGING RECEIVER USING CONDUCTIVE RUBBER CONTACTS FOR PROGRAMMING

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000006866D
Original Publication Date: 1993-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2002-Feb-07
Document File: 2 page(s) / 78K

Publishing Venue

Motorola

Related People

Timothy A. Dimacchia: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Presently programming a pager requires access to contacts located on the printed circuit board of the pager. There are access holes in the pager housing which allow spring loaded pins to protrude through the housing and make a connection with these contacts. Communica- tion with the pager is established through this interface. The drawback of this design is that foreign matter or moisture is allowed to enter into the pager through these access holes.

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MO-LA INC. Technical Developments Volume 19 June 1993

WATERPROOF PAGING RECEIVER USING CONDUCTIVE RUBBER CONTACTS FOR PROGRAMMING

by Timothy A. Dimacchia, Neil E. Gibson and Mike Weatherwax

  Presently programming a pager requires access to contacts located on the printed circuit board of the pager. There are access holes in the pager housing which allow spring loaded pins to protrude through the housing and make a connection with these contacts. Communica- tion with the pager is established through this interface. The drawback of this design is that foreign matter or moisture is allowed to enter into the pager through these

access holes.

  Using conductive rubber contacts to seal these access holes provides for the ability of establishing an electrical connection between the pager and some type of exter- nal programming interface unit while also providing for the ability to develop a waterproof pager by eliminating unobstructed access holes for moisture to pass through.

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Figure 1.

The invention uses a technology similar to that used in creating the rubber membrane buttons currently used in some of the paging products. A rubber membrane is made with the corresponding conductive rubber contacts built into it. When a user presses one of the function buttons, a conductive rubber contact built into the membrane causes a connection to be completed on the circuit board. (See Figure 2.)

0 Motorola, inc. 1993 35

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