Browse Prior Art Database

MEANINGFUL, TUNEFUL PAGER ALERT

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000006870D
Original Publication Date: 1993-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2002-Feb-07
Document File: 2 page(s) / 111K

Publishing Venue

Motorola

Related People

Robert Louis Breeden: AUTHOR

Abstract

Numeric display paging has become the most pop- ular form of paging in use today. In this form of paging a caller using a tone-dialing telephone typically dials a pager access number, followed by a call-back number at which the page recipient can telephone the caller and converse. Pager users, however, sometimes are in situations in which it is inconvenient or impossible to operate con- trol buttons on a pager to access and read the call-back number. Still, it would be very helpful if a pager could somehow automatically at the time of the alert give the pager user an idea of who is calhng, i.e., an idea of the urgency of the page. Hospital workers, for example, need to know whether a page is an emergency page from the emergency room, or a casual call from the lab to report on some test results.

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MO-LA INC. Technical Developments Volume 19 June 1993

MEANINGFUL, TUNEFUL PAGER ALERT

by Robert Louis Breeden

   Numeric display paging has become the most pop- ular form of paging in use today. In this form of paging a caller using a tone-dialing telephone typically dials a pager access number, followed by a call-back number at which the page recipient can telephone the caller and converse. Pager users, however, sometimes are in situations in which it is inconvenient or impossible to operate con- trol buttons on a pager to access and read the call-back number. Still, it would be very helpful if a pager could somehow automatically at the time of the alert give the pager user an idea of who is calhng, i.e., an idea of the urgency of the page. Hospital workers, for example, need to know whether a page is an emergency page from the emergency room, or a casual call from the lab to report on some test results.

  It is of course possible to assign a different pager address associated with a ditferent telephone access num- ber for use in causing the pager to alert differently for an emergency page. This approach has not proven itself popular in systems using city-wide paging systems, how- ever, because of the cost of the additional telephone access number.

  Because most pager users receive only a few really important and urgent call-back numbers, it is relatively easy for these users to recognize an important and urgent number once the number is accessed and appears on the pager's display. It would also be easy for a user to recognize a familiar sequence of alert tones if each alert tone in the sequence were directly related to a digit of the call-back number. For example, the digits 1,2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, and 0 could be assigned frequencies corresponding to notes horn the diatonic scale of C major. (l=C,2=D,3=E,4=ES=G,6=A,7=B,8=

C-an octave higher, 9 = D-an octave higher, and 0 = E-an octave higher.)

  Using the assignments described above, the call-back number 3331, for example, would cause the pager to alert with frequencies corresponding to E-E-E-C. The number 1-145-643-2777 would generate the alert C-C-F- G-A-F-E-D-B-B-B. Most music scholars will immedi- ately recognize these two examples as closely approxi- mating the beginnings of Beethoven's Fifth Symphony, and "Home on the Range:' respectively.

  While not alI call-back numbers will...