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LOST RADIO LOCATING

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000007071D
Original Publication Date: 1994-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2002-Feb-22
Document File: 2 page(s) / 109K

Publishing Venue

Motorola

Related People

Joseph Markovich: AUTHOR

Abstract

Since a communication system usually consists of many radios, it is possible for individual radios to become lost or stolen. This situation can be minor, such as the expense of replacing the radio, or be as serious as causing a security hazard. As might be the case in a secure (encrypted) system. Therefore, there must be a way to quickly determine the exact location of a radio. The following idea will allow someone to track a specific radio using moditica- tions to existing radio direction finding techniques.

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MOTOROLA Technical Developments Volume 21 February 1994

LOST RADIO LOCATING

by Joseph Markovich

mitter control information to the radio needs to be sent. This information can contain data on the rep- etition rate and duty cycle required by someone locat- ing the radio.

3. Transmission of uniqwradio ID:

Through the use of MDC or other RF data proto- col, the transmission of the unique radio ID code from the target radio can be sent. Typically, on an ordinary commercial frequency, there are many users. This causes problems with not being able to selectively direction find the specific radio. To adapt to this problem, the radio can be placed on another frequency or talk group. furthermore, the radio could be programmed to send out its unique ID on each keyup. This unique radio ID can then be used to unsquelch a listening device or trigger radio locat- ing equipment.

4. Radio audible tone generation:

When near the radio's exact location, target radio's RF level usually makes direction finding equipment useless, or insensitive to:!RF direction. Although the transmitter could be close in proximity, it may still be unseen. In this case," some form of audible tone at repeating intervals, rates, or frequencies emitted From the radio would be useful. The radio could be instructed to emit the tone from data sent over the

air to control the radio function.

INTRODUCTION:

  Since a communication system usually consists of many radios, it is possible for individual radios to become lost or stolen. This situation can be minor, such as the expense of replacing the radio, or be as serious as causing a security hazard. As might be the case in a secure (encrypted) system. Therefore, there must be a way to quickly determine the exact location of a radio. The following idea will allow someone to track a specific radio using moditica- tions to existing radio direction finding techniques.

DESCRIPTION:

  There are four modifications to existing radio direction finding techniques which can be used indi- vidually or collectively to reduce the time involved in locating a radio.

1. Disable or bypass the target radiokpower (sojipower):

In many current radios, there is a method of con- trolling the device's main power by software con- trol, called a sofiswitch. This activates a higher power control device which in turn applies or removes power to the radio. To incorporate the sofiswitch for use in this application, the rad...