Browse Prior Art Database

NEW CENTURY DATING SYSTEM

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000007092D
Original Publication Date: 1994-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2002-Feb-25
Document File: 3 page(s) / 195K

Publishing Venue

Motorola

Related People

Carlos Jofre Jr.: AUTHOR

Abstract

As we approach the end of the 20th Century, many information systems will have to deal with a major restructure of dated indexed records that hold only the year W, the month MM and the day DD. The immense task involved in a data conversion of this size will undoubtedly incur astronomical costs.

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MOTOROLA Technical Developments Volume 21 February 1994

NEW CENTURY DATING SYSTEM

by Carlos Jofre Jr.

  As we approach the end of the 20th Century, many information systems will have to deal with a major restructure of dated indexed records that hold only the year W, the month MM and the day DD. The immense task involved in a data conversion of this size will undoubtedly incur astronomical costs.

  Here in Motorola Paging Products Group, the Automated Manufacturing system will encounter such a problem in the non-RDBMS* environment, We must analyze now future solutions with extreme forethought in order to better handle our business into the next century The idea called the New Cen- tury Dating System (NCDS) will shine some light on what can be done to alleviate this colossal conversion.

  Currently, our manufacturing and distribution systems rely on the relational processing of dates to figure out day to day transactions such as Order Back- log, Delinquency Counts, automatic order release to automated manufacturing lines, etc. NCDS will

act as a filter that will enable current software to store, retrieve, convert, and compare dates beyond the year 1999 using the same storage'space that cur- rent dated records occupy. This is very important when you consider the fact that we currently store tens of thousands of dated records throughout our Manufacturing/Distribution Systems and an expan- sion of 33% (2 bytes per field) From YYMMDD (6 bytes) to YYYYMMDD can prove to be very expen- sive and time consuming. This filter or interface will consist of a set of library procedures and functions that will utilize a standard scheme of representing future dates. Figure 1 explains how this scheme will work.

  The hmdamental idea behind the conversion of dates is to maintain a consistent data storage area for existing and future records, thus avoiding the expansion of space, programming time, and general system resources that would otherwise be needed to introduce a four character year field (YYYY). Remember, today's date fields occupy space ranging from 5 to 8 bytes?

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*Relational Database Management Systems contain a special date type that would probably not be affected by the new century

0 Motorola, 1°C. 1994 39

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MO-LA Technical Developments Volume 21 February 1994

  The idea is based on the assumption that not all dates will have the same format, thus making it generic to three date formats.

These are:

European. DD-MM-W North American. MM-DD-YY System. W-MM-DD

The algorithm is based on the conversion ofthe year field (represented as W, ranging from 00 to
99). The rest ofthe date buffer will remain the same.

The YY characters of the year beyond 2000 will have the first character converted as follows:

  NCDS needs to know when it receives a YY value that is in fact above 2000. It will use a simple algorithm called The 99:Y...