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Method for a board bank for testing PCI and ISA boards

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000007096D
Publication Date: 2002-Feb-26
Document File: 3 page(s) / 81K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Disclosed is a method for a board bank for testing PCI and ISA boards. Benefits including improved quality, improved test environment, and improved productivity.

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Method for a board bank for testing PCI and ISA boards

Disclosed is a method for a board bank for testing PCI and ISA boards. Benefits including improved quality, improved test environment, and improved productivity.

Background

              Test lab technicians spend a great amount of time managing boards. Boards are in constant demand by developers for test purposes, and the current process is hard to control, highly decentralized, and entails substantial manual effort by everyone in board installation.

Description

              The disclosed method includes a device for speedily swapping board use between test machines. It expedites the shared use of plug-in boards for testing purposes. Three components are required: a bank of PCI or ISA slots to hold the boards to be tested, a bus broker box used to attach cables from various boards to cables from various laboratory machines, and specialized cables.

              The bank of slots, called a board bank (see Figure 1), contains an arbitrary number of individual slots, with no connections between themselves (see Figure 2A). Because computers must be shut down before boards are added, each machine's allocation of slots has an indicator that lights when the slot is powered up. Each slot is connected to a cable that terminates with a small board. It is used exclusively to attach to slots in the bus broker box (see Figure 2B). The slots on the component marked Bus Broker feed the signals from one side to the slot on the opposite side (see Figure 2D).

              The slots in the b...