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Method for the syntax of a scripting language for controlling reference design boards

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000007098D
Publication Date: 2002-Feb-26
Document File: 6 page(s) / 42K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Disclosed is a method for the syntax of a scripting language for controlling reference design boards. Benefits include improved functionality and improved productivity.

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Method for the syntax of a scripting language for controlling reference design boards

Disclosed is a method for the syntax of a scripting language for controlling reference design boards. Benefits include improved functionality and improved productivity.

Description

              The disclosed method provides a syntax that enables the user to control a reference design board that is comprised of many chips (for example, the SLT100) using a simple scripting language that provides simple control over the chips’ registers.

              A software interpreter executes the scripted commands (see Figure 1). Instructions like SETCHIP and SETREGSET enable the easy manipulation of individual chips on a reference design board.

              When a semicolon follows the PRINT instruction then a new line character will not be printed (see Figure 3).

              The line or block of code that follows the REPEAT instruction is repeated the designated number of times. The first example (see Figure 4) prints out “Hello, world…” The second example (see Figure 5) displays “$Z is equal to zero.” twice if variable $Z is zero. The third example (see Figure 6) displays “$Z is equal to zero.” with “Extra printed line.” twice below if the variable $Z is zero.

              When more than one line of code for execution occurs below a REPEAT or IF statement, then the lines must be enclosed inside a BEGIN/END block. All programs must end with an END instruction.

              The IF instruction enables a block of code to be executed when the condition is true. Assuming that $A is equal to $B (see Figure 7), then the next (following) instruction (for example, GOTO 40) executes. Otherwise, the instruction is skipped.

              The expression under evaluation must not contain space characters.

              Operators ‘=’, ‘<’, ‘>’, and ‘!’ (unequal) are implemented.

              The destination of a GOTO instruction must be an instruction in the block from which the GOTO originates.

              Statements following the TERMINATE instruction are not executed. The example (see Figure 8) terminates without printing “Hello, world”.

              Values are assigned using the ‘=’ operator (see Figure 9).

              The DO functions are implemented inside the interpreter and can take as parameters a register name “REG_NAME”, a register field name “FIELD_NAME”, or a literal value “LITERAL”. The types of their parameters are kept inside a configuration file. For example (see Figure 10), select chip “FEC100”, select register set “Global Control”, then read the DEVIDH and DEVIDL ID registers of that chip and print their contents.

              Apart from READ_REGISTER, other functions have been implemented, such as WRITE_REGISTER, READ_ADDRESS, WRITE_ADDRESS, READ_FIELDS, WRITE_FIELDS. With their syntax, these instructions provide simple control of the individual chips on a reference design board.

              Additional functions may implement more complex behaviour appropriate to the specific chip.

Advantages

              The disclosed scripting method provides improved chip control within a development process ...