Browse Prior Art Database

"FEEDERLESS" ASSEMBLY

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000007112D
Original Publication Date: 1994-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2002-Feb-26
Document File: 2 page(s) / 104K

Publishing Venue

Motorola

Related People

Jeff Beak: AUTHOR

Abstract

During normal product assembly operations each piece part used in the unit needs to be individually introduced to the operator or machine fabricating the assembly. In unit assembly operations,,most com- ponents are product specific and therefore unique to the industry. This results in non-standard compo- nent packaging and unique handling requirements which require unique feeders and/or customized trays be fabricated for introduction of the part into the station. This results in added design costs, mainte- nance costs and additional complexity in the assem- bly station. In addition, these types of feeding sce- narios also increase the amount of stocked material on the line and cause excessive overpack materials to be located in the immediate production area.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 50% of the total text.

Page 1 of 2

0 M MO-LA

Technical Developments Volume 21 February 1994

"FEEDERLESS" ASSEMBLY

by Jeff Beak

PROBLEM DEFINITION

  During normal product assembly operations each piece part used in the unit needs to be individually introduced to the operator or machine fabricating the assembly. In unit assembly operations,,most com- ponents are product specific and therefore unique to the industry. This results in non-standard compo- nent packaging and unique handling requirements which require unique feeders and/or customized trays be fabricated for introduction of the part into the station. This results in added design costs, mainte-

nance costs and additional complexity in the assem- bly station. In addition, these types of feeding sce- narios also increase the amount of stocked material on the line and cause excessive overpack materials to be located in the immediate production area.

  In traditional production areas, component feed- ing is typically accomplished by having the work piece move to a workstation where singular piece parts are fed to the operator or placement machine. (See Figure 1).

= On-line Inventory Stored on Feeders 0

:: u Fig. 1 -Traditional Assembly

Q Motorola. 1°C. 1994 59

[This page contains 14 pictures or other non-text objects]

Page 2 of 2

0 M MOm0l.A

Technical Developments Volume 21 February 1994

PRESENT DAY SOLUTION nents used in the assembly travel on the pallet from station to station until used. Figure 2 illustrates the In the "Feederless" Assembly system, compo- "Feederless" Assembly concept.

No PM Feedas at the Stations

Build Pallet

Assy Station.5 pick

from naylfum-e :, and build on Pallet ,,

Pam PIAmded into trav/hxNrc

Fig. 2 -"Fderkd' -bly Coaocpt

DESCRIPTION OF NEW CONCEPT

  The unique aspect of this technique is that all componeents used in the assembly of the product are "kitted" on the pallet prior to any assembly oper- ations. The process is accomplished in the...