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Method for a PC tower chassis design with airflow management

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000007141D
Publication Date: 2002-Feb-27
Document File: 5 page(s) / 73K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Disclosed is a method for a PC tower chassis design with airflow management. Benefits include improved thermal performance.

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Method for a PC tower chassis design with airflow management

Disclosed is a method for a PC tower chassis design with airflow management. Benefits include improved thermal performance.

Background

      In a conventional PC tower ATX box, the peripheral bay devices are located near the front panel of the chassis for easy user access (see Figure 1). The power supplier is typically located near the rear side of the chassis. All the components are located on the same side (such as the front side) of the motherboard. Airflow management is difficult because the inlet air is shared by all devices including the CPU, the chipset, PCI cards, memory, and peripheral devices (see Figure 2). The inlet air enters from the front panel and leaves from the rear side of the chassis and through the power supply. Two system fans are used to accelerate the airflow. Toward a CPU, the airflow may be easily blocked out or be preheated by the other components inside the chassis. If the air pressure/flow resistance is not well balanced inside the chassis, the airflow through the CPU may be significantly reduced or detoured due to the higher flow resistance of the CPU heatsinks. The chassis corners are typically dead air zones. The peripheral bay devices and the PCI cards may lack appropriate cooling.

    Conventionally, this problem is solved by adding a fan heatsink or a fan duct to enhance CPU cooling. However, the performance of the fan heatsink is often downgraded by the warm air circulating inside the chassis while the fan duct eliminates the available airflow to cool the other non-CPU components.

General description

     The disclosed method moves all the peripheral bay devices and the power supply behind the motherboard. The chassis is divided into three independent flow chambers (for example, CPU, PCI, and peripheral chambers) by dividers. Each chamber has its own air inlet and vent for effective cooling of the devices within the chamber. Because a straight flow path is provided to each chamber, the occurrence of dead air zones and circulated warm air are avoid...