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Mobility Service in a Two-Way Radio Voting Sub-System

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000007151D
Original Publication Date: 2002-Feb-27
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2002-Feb-27
Document File: 2 page(s) / 35K

Publishing Venue

Motorola

Related People

Richard Van Swol: AUTHOR

Abstract

In two-way radio systems the need exists for a reliable and cost effective automatic mechanism to enable subscribers to roam throughout the RF coverage area of a number of base stations. Systems with the need to have greater coverage than that supplied by one base station have had to rely on a number of sub-optimum techniques to allow subscriber radios to move from one stations coverage to anothers without subscriber operator manual operations. The techniques previously used have included sub-systems that voted the received signals from a number of stations RF receivers. The voted signal is then broadcast to the stations attached to the voter. These stations usually have unique transmit frequencies and a common receive frequency. In this way the transmissions from the stations are non-interfering. The goal is to get the subscriber radio to be assigned the proper receive frequency to receive a strong signal from a nearby station.

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Mobility Service

in a Two-Way Radio Voting Sub-System

By Richard Van Swol

 
 

In two-way radio systems the need exists for a reliable and cost effective automatic mechanism to enable subscribers to roam throughout the RF coverage area of a number of base stations. Systems with the need to have greater coverage than that supplied by one base station have had to rely on a number of sub-optimum techniques to allow subscriber radios to move from one station’s coverage to another’s without subscriber operator manual operations.

The techniques previously used have included sub-systems that voted the received signals from a number of stations’ RF receivers. The voted signal is then broadcast to the stations attached to the voter. These stations usually have unique transmit frequencies and a common receive frequency. In this way the transmissions from the stations are non-interfering. The goal is to get the subscriber radio to be assigned the proper receive frequency to receive a strong signal from a nearby station.

A common means employed to place the radio on the correct frequency is to have the subscriber radio’s receiver scan the transmit frequencies of the various stations in the voting sub-system. This technique although widely used has drawbacks. Scanning the complete list of frequencies requires a significant amount of time such that the first part of a transmission may be truncated. This truncation is troublesome for voice and signaling messages may not to be decoded.

To allevi...