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A NOVEL HIGH FREQUENCY BOND WIRE INTERFACE

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000007160D
Original Publication Date: 1994-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2002-Feb-28
Document File: 2 page(s) / 107K

Publishing Venue

Motorola

Related People

Bill T Agar Jr.: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

This paper describes a novel method of approach- ing the problem of bond wire interfaces for transi- tions to microwave and millimeter-wave hardware. In general, Monolithic Microwave Integrated Cir- cuits (MMICs), and Multi-Chip Modules (MCMs), make their electrical connections using wire bonds. However, these wire bonds present a significant induc- tive circuit parasitic at Microwave and millimeter- wave frequencies, thus making the design more dif- ficult. The bond wire interface described here takes advantage of the inductive circuit parasitic of the bond wire to create a controlled third order low-pass fil- ter structure.

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MOTOROLA Technical.Developments Volume 21 February 1994

A NOVEL HIGH FREQUENCY BOND WIRE INTERFACE

by Bill T Agar Jr., Deborah S. Bowser, Kenneth V. Buer and D&id W. Corman

  This paper describes a novel method of approach- ing the problem of bond wire interfaces for transi- tions to microwave and millimeter-wave hardware. In general, Monolithic Microwave Integrated Cir- cuits (MMICs), and Multi-Chip Modules (MCMs), make their electrical connections using wire bonds. However, these wire bonds present a significant induc- tive circuit parasitic at Microwave and millimeter- wave frequencies, thus making the design more dif- ficult. The bond wire interface described here takes advantage of the inductive circuit parasitic of the bond wire to create a controlled third order low-pass fil- ter structure.

  In general, MMICs are designed to include the wire bond parasitic inductance at the input and out- put ports. This configuration is shown in Figure 1. This arrangement generally poses several problems at higher microwave and millimeter wave fiequen- ties. First, a special matching circuit is added to the MMIC design adding complexity, size, and band- width restrictions. Second, measured RF probed per- formance of MMIC devices does not reflect actual performance because the wire bond parasitic is not included during test. Therefore an additional analy- sis step is required to account for the absence of the wire bond parasitic inductance during test. Third, the bond wire interface cannot be changed during module integration, because the parasitics are matched out on the MMIC chips.

  The new bond wire interface (Figure 2) avoids these problems by eliminating the need to include the wire bond parasitic inductance in the MMIC designs, This approach to bond wire interfaces has several advantages for high frequency applications when compared to standard wire bonding practices. First, it provides a robust and low loss transition from board to MMIC or between MMICs that is independent of process variations, frequency, and the inductance ofthe wire-bond. Second, since the ider-

face is easily modeled in' computer simulations and wire bonding is a well controlled process, the inven- tion eliminates de...