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AN ELASTOMERIC HOUSING LATCH FOR A PAGER OR SIMILAR DEVICE

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000007166D
Original Publication Date: 1994-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2002-Mar-01
Document File: 2 page(s) / 93K

Publishing Venue

Motorola

Related People

Chris Long: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

A variety of methods have been employed to hold the front and back of a pager housing together including screws, ultrasonic staking, and plastic latches. These have had varying amounts of success. Some were costly, requiring other parts such as threaded inserts in the case of screws, and were dif- ficult to assemble. Plastic latches can be broken and require very exact tolerances to function properly, Ultrasonic staking requires special staking equip- ment and closing the housing becomes permanent, so repairs are impossible. None of these methods provide any protection against accidental impact due to drop.

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Technical Developments Volume 21 February 1994

AN ELASTOMERIC HOUSING LATCH FOR A PAGER OR SIMILAR DEVICE

by Chris Long and Mel Teitzman

  A variety of methods have been employed to hold the front and back of a pager housing together including screws, ultrasonic staking, and plastic latches. These have had varying amounts of success. Some were costly, requiring other parts such as threaded inserts in the case of screws, and were dif- ficult to assemble. Plastic latches can be broken and require very exact tolerances to function properly, Ultrasonic staking requires special staking equip- ment and closing the housing becomes permanent, so repairs are impossible. None of these methods provide any protection against accidental impact due to drop.

  This design provides a latch that is molded as one piece in an elastomeric material (see figure 1). The shape is roughly a rectangle but the concept applies to circular designs as well. The latch mates to the hont and back housings. These housing halves are designed so that they only assemble in the z-axis (see Figure 2). After the front and back are assem- bled, the latch is stretched so that its overall perim- eter is increased. This allows the latch to be assem-

bled in the mating grooves as shown in the section view (see Figure 3). When the latch is allowed to return to shape, a ridge in the latch rests in a groove formed by the opposite halves of the front housing. This forms an interlock. Since the housing can...