Browse Prior Art Database

Telnet Protocol - a proposed document (RFC0137)

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000007193D
Original Publication Date: 1971-Apr-30
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2002-Mar-05
Document File: 12 page(s) / 20K

Publishing Venue

Internet Society Requests For Comment (RFCs)

Related People

T.C. O'Sullivan: AUTHOR

Abstract

This is a request for comment and is being distributed in advance of the Atlantic City meetings for review and comment prior to or during discussions on TELNET in preparation for issuing an official document.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 20% of the total text.

Network Working Group                                   T. C. O'Sullivan

Request for Comments: 137                                       Raytheon

NIC 6714                                                   30 April 1971

                            TELNET Protocol

   This is a request for comment and is being distributed in advance of

   the Atlantic City meetings for review and comment prior to or during

   discussions on TELNET in preparation for issuing an official

   document.

   It is also being distributed so that selected installations planning

   to implement early versions of TELNET will have a common basis for

   such implementation.

   The proposed document is the result of the work of the committee.  It

   represents a TELNET protocol felt to be adequate for initial

   implementation.  A few recent suggestions by committee members and

   others have been incorporated where even though not thoroughly

   cleared with all members, the chairman felt that they clarified the

   protocol or would tend to simplify implementation but not

   substantially change the agreed-upon approach.

   Readers are referenced to the following previous releases of

   information:

   1. Conventions for Using an IBM 2741 Terminal or a User Console for

      Access to Network Server HOSTS

         Joel Winett, RFC 110 (NIC #5809)

   2. Level III Server Protocol for the Lincoln Laboratory 360/67 HOST

         Joel Winett, RFC 109 (NIC #5808)

   3. First Cut at a Proposed TELNET Protocol

         J. Melvin, D. Watson, RFC 97 (NIC #5740)

   4. ASCII Format for Network Interchange

         V. Cerf, RFC 20 (NIC# 4722)

   Another RFC will be distributed prior to the Atlantic City Meetings

   containing many of the arguments supporting the proposal.

O'Sullivan                                                      [Page 1]

RFC 137                     TELNET Protocol                   April 1971

                            TELNET PROTOCOL

                          A Proposed Document

                T. O'Sullivan for the TELNET Committee

               Will Crowther                 BBN

               Bob Long                      SDC

               John Melvin                   SRI-ARC

               Bob Metcalf                   Harvard

               Ed Meyer                      MAC

               Tom O'Sullivan (Chairman)     Raytheon

               Joel Winett                   MIT-LL

O'Sullivan                                                      [Page 2]

RFC 137                     TELNET Protocol                   April 1971

   TELNET is a third-level protocol, the function of which is to make a

   terminal (or process) at a using site appear to the system or a

   process at a serving site as logically equivalent to a terminal

   "directly" connected to the serving site.  In performing this

   function, the protocol attempts to minimize the amount of information

   each HOST must keep about the characteristics of other HOSTS.

   Definitions

   Protocol Levels (see Figure 1)

      Level 1

         HOST-IMP protocol specified by BBN in NIC 5735, Specifications

         for the Interconnection of a HOST, and an IMP (BBN Report 1822)

      Level 2

         HOST-HOST protocol performed by NCPs as described in Document

         Number 1 (NIC 5413) and subsequent amendments, see RFC 107 (NIC

         #5806)

            One view of the NCP's function is that it takes information

            from the net and routes it to receiving processes via

            mechanisms internal to each HOST; conversely, processes use

            the NCP, via internal system calls, to have information

            routed to other processes in the net (via the other

            processes' NCPs).

      Level 3 (see Figure 2)

         Level 3 is, by definition, the place to which and from which

         the NCP communicates internally in its own host.

            This level may be equivalent to the...