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Method for failure analysis case sharing using a remotely operated robotic handler

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000007234D
Publication Date: 2002-Mar-06
Document File: 4 page(s) / 264K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Disclosed is a method for failure analysis case sharing using a remotely operated robotic handler. Benefits include improved utilization of test equipment and improved test reliability.

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Method for failure analysis case sharing using a remotely operated robotic handler

Disclosed is a method for failure analysis case sharing using a remotely operated robotic handler. Benefits include improved utilization of test equipment and improved test reliability.

Description

              The disclosed method includes a small mechanical handler (see Figure 1) that enables the remote operation of existing test equipment using a LAN/WAN network. Remote sites in different time zones may utilize systems that might otherwise be idle.

              The handler automates the tedious job of socketing individual units for testing, which conventionally is done manually. The manual socketing of units onto a tester requires the physical presence of an engineer or technician and is a source for testing error. This error can be induced by the application of insufficient force to the device under test (DUT), resulting in continuity failures (such as opens and shorts). By automating the socketing, a consistent force is applied to every DUT, eliminating erroneous readings.

              The handler is a remote automation system (RAS) and is capable of simultaneously holding four units. Each user, whether remote or local, selects one unit to be placed in the socket for testing (see Figure 2). One holding place is assigned to a golden unit for result comparison. Units belonging to remote/local users scheduled to work on different failure analysis cases occupy the other holding places.

              The DUTs are held in place by means of vacuum cups mounted on the individual test heads. These product-specific test heads serve as heat dissipaters as well as an interf...