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MICROMECHANICAL SYRINGE FOR INTRA-CELLULAR SURGERY

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000007279D
Original Publication Date: 1994-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2002-Mar-11
Document File: 3 page(s) / 165K

Publishing Venue

Motorola

Related People

Jon T. Fitch: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Both gripper and syringe could be mounted on a computer controlled micromotion system that would be operated by separate joy sticks in the hands of a biologist who could view:the surgery under a micro- scope. While this invention was intended for the biological field, there are many other applications for this technology. The process flow for the micromechanical syringe is as follows: 1. Pattern and etch a narrow (0.5 micron) wide trench into a silicon substrate.

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MOIOROLA Technical Developments Volume 23 October 1994

MICROMECHANICAL SYRINGE FOR INTRA-CELLULAR SURGERY

by Jon T Fitch, T. F! Ong and Kimberly G. Reid

Both gripper and syringe could be mounted on a computer controlled micromotion system that would be operated by separate joy sticks in the hands of a biologist who could view:the surgery under a micro- scope. While this invention was intended for the biological field, there are many other applications for this technology. The process flow for the micromechanical syringe is as follows:

1. Pattern and etch a narrow (0.5 micron) wide trench into a silicon substrate.

2. Pattern and etch a deep (several microns) wide circular trench into the silicon substrate. This will become the "pressure" cavity that contains the vol- ume offluid (or air) pulled into the syringe.

3. Deposit an oxide liner layer followed by a thick layer ofsacrificial material such as tungsten, nitride, or amorphous silicon. Perform a planar etchback or chemical mechanical pohshing to slightly undertill the etched cavities.

4. Deposit a second oxide layer to form the mem- brane of the pressure cavity and the roof of the syringe needle as shown in Figure 1. By choice of the mem- brane material and its thickness, the pull (or usea- ble volume) ofthe syringe is determined.

5. Pattern and etch a deep hole from the back side

of the wafer, stopping on' the oxide liner at the bot- tom of the pressure cavity. A brief RIE etch can be used to cut through the oxide liner. A hot phospho- ric acid etch can then be 'used to remove the sacriti- cial material (in the case: of nitride sacrificial mate- rial) from the pressure cavity and the needle. Alternatively, the sacrificial material could be amor- phous silicon which could be removed by the use of an EDP etchant.

6. Use selective silicon growth to close the hole in back of the substrate used to remove the sacrificial material.

0 Motorola,

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DEFINITION OF PROBLEM

  One of the most promising new technologies for improving our quality of life is the manipulation and transfer ofgenetic material between cells. Genet- ically altered cells have already been made in the laboratory and cultured in large enough numbers for evaluation in animals. This technology has already shown great promise for cancer treatment, treatment of immune disorders, and treatment of genetically inherited diseases. One of the problems now facing bio-technologists is how to transfer very small quan- tities of genetic material horn a donor cell and insert this material into a host cell.

PRIOR ART

  Several excellent articles have been written about the problem of manipulating fluids on a microme- chanical scale!J Due to the interest in ink jet print- ing technology, work has been done on micro- machining of nozzles in silicon! A great deal of work has been done in fabricating diaphragms for the pur- pose of making pressure sensors?J.6 Micromachined pressure sensors and integrated sensor structures are al...