Browse Prior Art Database

QUEUED VOICE CALL PROCESSING FOR WIDE AREA SYSTEMS

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000007294D
Original Publication Date: 1994-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2002-Mar-12
Document File: 1 page(s) / 71K

Publishing Venue

Motorola

Related People

Chaim Melamed: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

When a wide area call is placed in a Wide Area system, such as a SmartZone system, ifa non-critical site is busy, that audio will never reach the subscribers in that site (or sites), and audio is lost. Even in the case where voice channels become available at that site, subscribers can only hear the end of the con- versation. In order to deal with such problems, resources must be allocated prior to the start of the call in order to insure that every site has received the call. This can quickly become an inefhcient way of doing things should we have many wide area calls at a time with high levels oftraffic.

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MOTOROLA Technical Developments Volume 23 October 1994

QUEUED VOICE CALL PROCESSING FOR WIDE AREA SYSTEMS

by Chaim Melamed, Eduardo Gonzalez and Larry Peterson

  When a wide area call is placed in a Wide Area system, such as a SmartZone system, ifa non-critical site is busy, that audio will never reach the subscribers in that site (or sites), and audio is lost. Even in the case where voice channels become available at that site, subscribers can only hear the end of the con- versation. In order to deal with such problems, resources must be allocated prior to the start of the call in order to insure that every site has received the call. This can quickly become an inefhcient way of doing things should we have many wide area calls at a time with high levels oftraffic.

The method we propose, allows delivery of audio

without any user intervention, to those non-critical sites that are busy at the time. This method may also be used for individual radios, in the case that the particular subscriber is in a dispatch call.

  The heart of the method involves capturing the audio, storing it and playing it as soon as we have an available voice channel at the busy site (or the individual radio is available). All this will happen aute matically, with the benefit that the user at the receiv- ing end will be notified when the audio is real and when it is queued voice. The examples below illus- trate what will happen when trying to deliver a mes- sage to a radio (or site) which is busy:

PRIVATE CALL SCENARiO:

  An ISW is sent from...