Browse Prior Art Database

TIMESLOT POWER CONTROL HANDSHAKE

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000007341D
Original Publication Date: 1995-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2002-Mar-18
Document File: 2 page(s) / 100K

Publishing Venue

Motorola

Related People

Chuck Carter: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

In today's two-way hand-held portable radio mar- ket, radio size and duty cycle are feature drivers, In an attempt to move toward smaller physical (smaller battery) and longer operating lifetime, an emphasis is being made to reduce operating current consump- tion. In a typical hand held two-way radio, transmit power is typically 3-Swat& Even though usage models indicate that transmit mode is a small percentage of the operating mode, it consumes a large amount of power. This publication outlines a method for scal- ing back the transmit power under appropriate con- ditions in order to reduce operating current consumption.

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MO7WROLA Technical Developments Volume 24 March 1995

TIMESLOT POWER CONTROL HANDSHAKE

by Chuck Carter and Rich Young

  In today's two-way hand-held portable radio mar- ket, radio size and duty cycle are feature drivers, In an attempt to move toward smaller physical (smaller battery) and longer operating lifetime, an emphasis is being made to reduce operating current consump- tion. In a typical hand held two-way radio, transmit power is typically 3-Swat& Even though usage models indicate that transmit mode is a small percentage of the operating mode, it consumes a large amount of power. This publication outlines a method for scal- ing back the transmit power under appropriate con- ditions in order to reduce operating current consumption.

  In a typical two-way radio, transmit power is a function of delivering a signal with an acceptable signal to noise ratio (SNR) to a receiver a given distance away. The huther the distance to the receiver, the greater the transmit power required to deliver the given SNR. For shorter distances lower trans- mit power is sufficient.

  In a full duplex system such as a cellular sys- tem, the receiving base station computes a signal to noise ratio (SNR) on the received signal from the portable subscriber unit. This information is then relayed back to the subscriber unit which can in turn adjust it's power down if the signal strength allows it. In a non duplex system such as a trunked radio system, this becomes more difficult. Astro sig- nailing is used as an example of how a time slot can be used to receive SNR information horn the base (or designated subscriber) at the beginning of each transmission for a non-duplex system. However this same technique could be applied to just about any radio system utilizing digital or quasi-digital signaling.

  Referring to Figure 1 below, a normal Astro voice message would look like item 4 consisting of a Pre- amble tone followed by a synchronization pattern in turn followed by Link Data Units. Items 1 and 2 would be appended to the beginning of each transmission.

&q LC

LDUl LDUZ

Preamble 1 Sl d VS...