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Browse Prior Art Database

MESSAGE LENGTH QUANTIZATION AND DISPLAY

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000007409D
Original Publication Date: 1995-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2002-Mar-22
Document File: 2 page(s) / 90K

Publishing Venue

Motorola

Related People

Edward L. Ehmke: AUTHOR

Abstract

The majority of paging devices on the market today receive relatively short messages, made up of phone numbers and other messages such as "Call Pete at 555-12121' As paging becomes better known and used by more people, users are expecting to send and receive more and longer messages. Conse- quently, modern pagers are capable of receiving a significant number of messages that could be a mix- ture of the short messages described above and long, informative messages. However, when long and short messages are mixed in memory and the pager user desires to review messages, it could take a signih- cant amount of time to scan through long messages.

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MOTOROLA Technical Developments Volume 24 March 1995

MESSAGE LENGTH QUANTIZATION AND DISPLAY

by Edward L. Ehmke

  The majority of paging devices on the market today receive relatively short messages, made up of phone numbers and other messages such as "Call Pete at 555-12121' As paging becomes better known and used by more people, users are expecting to send and receive more and longer messages. Conse- quently, modern pagers are capable of receiving a significant number of messages that could be a mix- ture of the short messages described above and long, informative messages. However, when long and short messages are mixed in memory and the pager user desires to review messages, it could take a signih- cant amount of time to scan through long messages.

  One way of handling this is to keep the short and long messages separated into two different mem- ories, so the user can review either his short mes- sages or switch to the other memory to review the long messages. The downside of this is that the mem- ory is not efficiently utilized and may be wasted. The solution to this problem is a method of storing both short and long messages in one memory, thereby allowing for efficient utilization of the memory avail-

able, and of quantizing the size of each message in each memory and displaying that to the user so that long messages may be skipped.

  When messages are received and stored in mem- ory, the amount of memory required for each mes- sage is noted by the decoder and displayed as part of the icon display for that message. Message size may be in bytes of memory required, the number of char- acters in the message, or any other relative quanti- zation, but the exact size of each message is not of critical importance. What is displayed is gradations of an icon related to the...