Browse Prior Art Database

DYNAMIC ADDRESS SEQUENCING METHOD

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000007486D
Original Publication Date: 1995-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2002-Apr-01
Document File: 9 page(s) / 345K

Publishing Venue

Motorola

Related People

John Zhonghe Wang: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Battery life is a big concern for some ofthe selec- tive signaling systems, such as PCS and Paging sys- tems. This paper describes an address sequencing method and the associated system architecture to improve the battery efficiency for the selective sig- naling receivers.

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Technical Developments

DYNAMIC ADDRESS SEQUENCING METHOD

by John Zhonghe Wang and Yingyueh Chang

  Battery life is a big concern for some ofthe selec- tive signaling systems, such as PCS and Paging sys- tems. This paper describes an address sequencing method and the associated system architecture to improve the battery efficiency for the selective sig- naling receivers.

  The existing technique in the selective signal- ing systems is to transmit the addresses in an FIFO (first in first out) or an ascending (or equivalently descending) order,

  Considering the fact that more than 99.9% of the messages are not for the receiver, the FIFO tech- nique requires decoding all the transmitted addresses. There is definitely room let? in battery life improve- ment over the FIFO technique.

  The ascending (descending) address sequencing technique is an improvement over that of the FIFO. Since, in average, only half of the addresses are decoded. But this technique has a tendency of decoding less for the selective signaling receiver with a smaller address (larger address). This is consid- ered to be unfair.

  The proposed technique minimizes the average number of decoded addresses (the optimal battery saver) and improves the fairness over the existing techniques.

classification information. The classifications are denoted as follows:
lower boundary 000 high boundary 001 first (second) point ofan interval 010 forms extra interval with boundary 011 lower end ofinterval exists 100 higher end ofinterval exists 101 single point 110 forms extra interval with other address 111

  The lower boundary is defined as the lowest address among the transmitted addresses in the frame. The high boundary is defined as the highest address among the transmitted addresses in the frame. The first (second) point of on interval is self explanatory. The&t point of an interval (with smaller address value) is always followed by (transmitted before) the secondpoint of an interval (with a bigger address value). The lower end of interval exists indi- cates that the associated address forms an interval with a transmitted address which is the highest lower bound (hlb) of the associated address. The higher end of interval exists indicates that the associated address forms an interval with a transmitted address which is the lowest upper bound (lub) of the associated address. The single point indicates that both the highest lower bound and the lowest upper bound of the associated address have been trans- mitted. The class 011 indicates that the associated address forms an extra interval with boundary. The class 111 indicates that the associated address forms an extra interval with a transmitted address.

  The following Figure makes these concepts eas- ier to understand. The addresses and their classitica- tions are transmitted in the sequence ofAd to Ad4.

1. INTRODUCTION

2. TECHNICAL DETAILS

Suppose the domain of the address is known. The addresses are transmitted together with thei...