Browse Prior Art Database

AUTOMATIC RESPONSE TO RADIO EVENTS WITH DYNAMIC PARAMETERS

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000007541D
Original Publication Date: 1995-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2002-Apr-04
Document File: 2 page(s) / 119K

Publishing Venue

Motorola

Related People

Pnina Lavie: AUTHOR

Abstract

As part of radio control systems management like SIMS for Smartnet or SmartZone Dispatcher for SmartZone, dispatchers located at a fixed termi- nal execute radio commands. Dispatchers regroup radios into different talkgroups, inhibit radios from transmitting or receiving signals, lock radio chan- nel switch selector, send call alert to a radio and allow the radio operator to respond by giving them the radio ID of the caller, and check if a radio is "alive? Dispatchers also monitor incoming events (trans- missions, requests) from the radio system. This monitoring involves, for example, the display ofradio transmissions such as talkgroup calls, reprogram requests, emergency alarms, statuses and messages.

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Technical Developments

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AUTOMATIC RESPONSE TO RADIO EVENTS WITH DYNAMIC PARAMETERS

by Pnina Lavie

  As part of radio control systems management like SIMS for Smartnet or SmartZone Dispatcher for SmartZone, dispatchers located at a fixed termi- nal execute radio commands. Dispatchers regroup radios into different talkgroups, inhibit radios from transmitting or receiving signals, lock radio chan- nel switch selector, send call alert to a radio and allow the radio operator to respond by giving them the radio ID of the caller, and check if a radio is "alive?

  Dispatchers also monitor incoming events (trans- missions, requests) from the radio system. This monitoring involves, for example, the display ofradio transmissions such as talkgroup calls, reprogram requests, emergency alarms, statuses and messages.

  Generally, the radio sends a request or a mes- sage to the dispatcher, and the dispatcher decides what activities should be performed in accordance with the radio's incoming event, i.e. the response to the radio user needs is done manually, and this can imply problems. For example: the dispatcher's response depends only on his discretion; it can take expensive time to respond; the dispatcher is not located at his terminal at the moment the request arrived, so the response is not immediate; there is no dispatcher currently who is responsible for the radio that sent the request, so the request is ignored, etc.

  However, there are emergency situations that require an immediate and correct response, which cannot depend on the dispatcher situation. For exam ple, in the current SIMVSmartZone mechanism, when a radio sends an emergency alarm it is forwarded to a dispatcher (if there is one that is able to get it), and the dispatcher generally responds to the emergency alarm according to a predelined pro- cedure. Since this response is done manually, it can cause problems as described above.

Today, in SIMS and in other radio control sys-

tems management, there is no mechanism that allows an automatic response to requests from radios.

  The suggested arrangement is to allow automatic response to requests from a radio, and moreover; this response will be dependent on parameters sent from the radio.

  This is useful, for example, when an emergency alarm reaches the radio control system management, then a storm plan or a command will be sent auto- matically (without human involvement) from the control system management to subscribers in the radio system for handling the emergency situation.

  As described above, the main p...