Dismiss
There will be a system update on Friday, May 5th, 6 PM ET. You may experience a brief service interruption.
Browse Prior Art Database

INBOUND CALL STEERING/CALL MACRO PROCESSING

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000007545D
Original Publication Date: 1995-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2002-Apr-04
Document File: 2 page(s) / 95K

Publishing Venue

Motorola

Related People

Dan O'Malley: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

In dispatch centers, presently every operator gets all the inbound call activity presented to them on a console screen. This causes confusion, because there is too much information. For example, a particular operator can't tell if a particular call is being han- dled by another operator. Also, there is no way to filter the incoming information so as to present only the relevant information. Also, unnecessary voice communication is needed to identify the dispatcher who should be handling the call.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 50% of the total text.

Page 1 of 2

0 M

MO7VROLA ' Technical Developments

INBOUND CALL STEERING/CALL MACRO PRbCESSlNG

by Dan D'hlalley and Tim McVey

BACKGROUND:

SOLUTION:

  In dispatch centers, presently every operator gets all the inbound call activity presented to them on a console screen. This causes confusion, because there is too much information. For example, a particular operator can't tell if a particular call is being han- dled by another operator. Also, there is no way to filter the incoming information so as to present only the relevant information. Also, unnecessary voice communication is needed to identify the dispatcher who should be handling the call.

  The solution is to equip the subscriber unit with a plurality of buttons, each button associated with a diirent type of call. For example, a first button would be for fire calls, a second~button would be for police calls, and a third button would be for emergency calls. Further, once the call is received into the sys- tem, the call will be routed to an assigned dispatcher to handle that type of call. If the call is not answered within a certain period of time, it could be trans- ferred to one or more other dispatchers. Priority can be assigned to calls that have been waiting for longer periods of time. Also, priority can be assigned accord- ing to call-types.

  Another part of receiving the call can cause a previously-defined function to be executed. For exam- ple, an editor could be called up to till out an inci- dent report for that particular subscriber. It can also bring up history for that subscriber. The essence of the system is taking the call event and deciding what dispatcher should be alerted, and ensuring that some- one will answer the call;, and optionally running a predelined function. ~

PRIOR ART:

  Today, this is done via CAD systems with a sep- arate computer and display in addit...