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Method for an integrated on chip thermoelectric cooling module

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000007591D
Publication Date: 2002-Apr-08
Document File: 6 page(s) / 327K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Disclosed is a method for an integrated on-chip thermoelectric cooling (TEC) module. Benefits include improved functionality, improved thermal performance, and simplified manufacturing process.

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Method for an integrated on chip thermoelectric cooling module

Disclosed is a method for an integrated on-chip thermoelectric cooling (TEC) module. Benefits include improved functionality, improved thermal performance, and simplified manufacturing process.

Background

              High-speed microprocessors generate increasing amounts of heat that must be dissipated to ensure the processor’s successful operation. This problem is conventionally solved by the use of heatsinks.

              Conventional thermoelectric cooling (TEC) modules are not cost effect and cannot remove more than ~10 W/cm2 of heat.

              The projected requirements for a backside tool set are identical to that conventionally in use for wafer-side processing.

              Passing current through two dissimilar electrical conductors causes heat to be either emitted or absorbed at the junction of the materials (see Figure 1).

              A conventional TEC module consists of an array of bismuth-telluride semiconductor pellets that have been doped so that one type of charge carrier, either positive (P) or negative (N), carries the majority of the current (see Figure 2). P/N pellets are configured to be connected electrically in series and thermally in parallel. A heatsink is required to dissipate heat from the hot side to the environment (see Figure 3). When direct current (DC) voltage is applied to the TEC module, the positive and negative charge carriers in the pellet array absorb heat energy from one substrate surface and release heat to the opposite side. The surface where energy is absorbed becomes cold. The surface where heat energy is released becomes hot. The circulating DC carries heat from the thermal load to some type of heatsink that can effectively discharge the heat into the outside environment.

              Each individual thermoelectric system design has a unique capacity for pumping heat (in Watts per hour). The capacity is influenced by many factors. The most important variables include:

§         Ambient temperature

§         Physical and electrical charact...