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Method for an ESD grounding clip for next-generation form factor modules

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000007594D
Publication Date: 2002-Apr-08
Document File: 3 page(s) / 298K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Disclosed is a method for an ESD grounding clip for next-generation form factor modules. Benefits include improved functionality and improved maintainability.

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Method for an ESD grounding clip for next-generation form factor modules


Disclosed is a method for an ESD grounding clip for next-generation form factor modules. Benefits include improved functionality and improved maintainability.

Background

              In conventional systems, the ground clips are typically located in the chassis. Most clips that reside on a printed circuit board (PCB) are screwed or soldered into place. When soldered into place, a clip cannot be easily replaced if it becomes damaged. When screwed into place, the clip can be replaced with some relative ease but requires additional hardware and board space.

              The system chassis is burdened with the cost of all ground clips (assuming they are in the design). So, whether a system is completely loaded with modules (as many as 42 modules), or the system contains only one module, the system chassis is burdened with the cost of the clips for every module. As a result, many system chassis omit the grounding clips completely. The omission of the clips leaves the printed circuit board susceptible to ESD damage.

Description

              The disclosed method includes a ground clip to be used with next-generation form factor modules. The ground clip snaps over the edge of a PCB (see Figure 1). For compact PCI and cPCI-like form factors, the circuit board used with the clip is the system chassis.

              The snap is achieved by creating small barbs on both side of the clip (see Figure 2). These barbs lock into a hole in the printed circuit board and prev...