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Glow in the dark bicycle helmet

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000007612D
Publication Date: 2002-Apr-09
Document File: 1 page(s) / 492K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Bicycling is a popular means of transportation for millions of people. However, traveling at night poses increased safety risks for bicyclists because of reduced visibility by motorized vehicle drivers. Many electric safety lights designed for bicyclists are currently on the market to help solve this problem. However, oftentimes bicyclists forget to turn the lights on, especially at dawn and dusk. What is needed is a way to improve visibility for bicyclists that requires no effort from the bicyclist.

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Glow in the dark bicycle helmet

Bicycling is a popular means of transportation for millions of people.  However, traveling at night poses increased safety risks for bicyclists because of reduced visibility by motorized vehicle drivers.  Many electric safety lights designed for bicyclists are currently on the market to help solve this problem.  However, oftentimes bicyclists forget to turn the lights on, especially at dawn and dusk.  What is needed is a way to improve visibility for bicyclists that requires no effort from the bicyclist.

The present invention is a glow in the dark bicycle helmet 100,  that includes a reinforced styrofoam liner 110 and a glow-in-the-dark shell 120.

Figure 1 Glow in the dark bicycle helmet

Luminesence from shell 120 comes from sulfide-type phosphors.  Sulfide-type phosphors are produced from pure zinc or cadmium sulfide or their mixtures by heating them together with small quantities (0.1-0.001 percent) of copper, silver, gallium, or other salts (activators) and with about 2 percent of sodium or another alkali chloride at about 1,000 C (1,832 F). The role of the alkali halides is to facilitate the melting process and, above all, to serve as coactivators (fluxes). Only small quantities of the alkali halide are integrated into the phosphor, but this small quantity is highly important for its luminescence efficiency.