Browse Prior Art Database

AUTOMATIC RADIO STATUS ELEVATION

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000007664D
Original Publication Date: 1996-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2002-Apr-12
Document File: 1 page(s) / 78K

Publishing Venue

Motorola

Related People

Brian Bunkenburg: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

In today's trunked two-way radio systems, every radio user communication unit is pre-programmed with certain functionality in the radio itself and in the fixed end controlling equipment. Typically a supervisory radio user subscribes to more services and has more "privileges" than the normal talkgroup members that he or she supervises. These supervi- sors provide the entire group with information, con- tact point and functionality vital to the mission of the group. Currently there is no automatic means to insure that a person is always assigned this function and has a radio equipped with these extended privi- leges and services in the event that the current super- visor is unable to perform their function.

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MOTOROLA Technical Developments

AUTOMATIC RADIO STATUS ELEVATION

by Brian Bunkenburg, Gary Grube, Marc Naddell

  In today's trunked two-way radio systems, every radio user communication unit is pre-programmed with certain functionality in the radio itself and in the fixed end controlling equipment. Typically a supervisory radio user subscribes to more services and has more "privileges" than the normal talkgroup members that he or she supervises. These supervi- sors provide the entire group with information, con- tact point and functionality vital to the mission of the group. Currently there is no automatic means to insure that a person is always assigned this function and has a radio equipped with these extended privi- leges and services in the event that the current super- visor is unable to perform their function.

  Dynamic regrouping by itself takes a configura- tion file t?om a management computer and trans- mits it to a comm unit to replace a portion of its configuration code plug. It does not automatically take the actual code plug, and other operational pro- gramming of one comm unit, that is going out of service, and program another unit with that infor- mation and give it instructions that it has just been "promoted?' Instead, the users of the current regrouping equipment would have to manually enter the desired radio attributes and then send the regrouping commands over the air.

  This problem can be solved by allowing a sec- ond communication unii to mimic the services and access privileges of the first unit based on a trigger event. The trigger event; could be a manual initia- tion by the first user, or if the first unit de-affiliates from the group or system, or if the user powers down the radio, or if they go,off to make a phone call. When this ha...