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Method for a universal ejector array

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000007690D
Publication Date: 2002-Apr-15
Document File: 3 page(s) / 21K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Disclosed is a method for a universal ejector array. Benefits include reduced product damage and loss.

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Method for a universal ejector array

Disclosed is a method for a universal ejector array. Benefits include reduced product damage and loss.

Background

              Multiple die size-specific ejectors are required to support production. The installation and set up of the ejectors is dependant on people and subject to error.

              The ejector array on a die-attach/die-sort tool assists in the release of the singulated die from the mylar. The ejector needles are extended (for example, 1400 microns) pushing the die away from the mylar while the chuck vacuum is pulling the mylar away from the die.

              Ejectors are hand numbered and stored in the production area. A Manufacturing Technician (MT) is required to read the operations specification and choose the ejector specified for the product type. The MT must then inspect ejector needles and install/assemble them correctly into the die sort tool.

              The conventional solution contains needles embedded in a brass base and held in place by screws (see Figure 1). The vacuum chuck is 30 mm to 50 mm in diameter, depending on the die size. Needles extend through holes in the chuck. Arrays are typically comprised of five round-tipped needles.

General description

              The disclosed method isa modified ejector head based on dot-matrix print-head technology. Selection of the correct array for any given die size is software programmable.

              The basic ejector design is well known. The disclosed method automates conventional ejector design rules into a machine function. Automation prevents human error and decreases the variety of ejectors required to support production.

              The key element of the method is the software-programmable ej...