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Method for using a highly thermal-conductive keypad and metallic front panel to dissipate heat from a cellular phone

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000007716D
Publication Date: 2002-Apr-16
Document File: 4 page(s) / 90K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Disclosed is a method for using a highly thermal-conductive keypad and metallic front panel to dissipate heat from a cellular phone. Benefits include improved thermal performance.

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Method for using a highly thermal-conductive keypad and metallic front panel to dissipate heat from a cellular phone

Disclosed is a method for using a highly thermal-conductive keypad and metallic front panel to dissipate heat from a cellular phone. Benefits include improved thermal performance.

Background

              The power dissipation of the logic component inside the cellular phone keeps increasing. The conventional cooling solution is the natural convection within the limited space inside the phone and is no longer sufficient.

              The conventional design includes a plastic front panel and a silicone rubber keypad for the current cellular phone design (see Figure 1). The plastic and silicone rubber are both low-thermal conductive materials that form a thermal barrier between the internal components and the external ambient.

               The logic component is typically mounted on the bottom side of a PCB (see Figure 2). The topside is the keypad circuit. Although the PCB can help spread the heat from the logic component, the heat is difficult to dissipate to the external ambient because the plastic front panel and the silicone rubber keypad form thermal barriers due to their low thermal conductivities.

General description

              The disclosed method is cellular phone case design. A highly thermal-conductive keypad is made of silicone rubber with zinc oxide, aluminum oxide, and boron nitride particles. The keypad enhances heat transfer from the internal components inside the cellular phone to the external ambient environment. A metallic front panel with metal posts forms additional thermal conduction paths from PCB t...