Browse Prior Art Database

AUTOMATIC SERVICE AREA PROGRAMMING

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000007741D
Original Publication Date: 1996-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2002-Apr-18
Document File: 2 page(s) / 131K

Publishing Venue

Motorola

Related People

Rafael Diaz: AUTHOR

Abstract

The concept of radio service areas has been brought to light in recent years with the advent of Cellular systems. Currently a cellular service pro- vider has the ability to limit users to use the radio within a certain geographic area. Similarly, a sys- tem like iDEN can provide the same function for a group of users. The method of determining what this service area should be is done manually by the user themselves. Its purpose is to allow the system operators greater control over what geographical areas they will allow the users of their systems to roam into. This further allows them the ability to charge their customers different rates based on the service area each customer wishes to be able to communi- cate in. Currently, the only way to either determine what areas a particular group of users require or to change a user or group of users service area is by manually reprogramming either the subscriber unit or the fixed end system. This is not very cost efficient or convenient for the users or the service provider.

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MolylcKllA Technical Developments

8

AUTOMATIC SERVICE AREA PROGRAMMING

by Rafael Diaz

type of operation, each subscriber unit must be indi- vidually programmed to only recognize the partic- ular sites that they will be allowed to use. The fixed end controller will also have to be manually pro- grammed to either allow or disallow certain subscriber units to operate at certain sites. The pro- gramming must match in both the subscriber unit(s) and the fixed. There is a possibility ofprogramming errors and a mis-match of what is programmed in the fixed end controller and what is programmed in the subscriber units. Also, a particular user or group of users may not know at the time they sub- scribe to the service as to what areas they will need coverage in. This results in re-programming at a later time thereby causing both the user and the service provider lost time along with the expense of reprogramming.

BACKGROUND

  The concept of radio service areas has been brought to light in recent years with the advent of Cellular systems. Currently a cellular service pro- vider has the ability to limit users to use the radio within a certain geographic area. Similarly, a sys- tem like iDEN can provide the same function for a group of users. The method of determining what this service area should be is done manually by the user themselves. Its purpose is to allow the system operators greater control over what geographical areas they will allow the users of their systems to roam into. This further allows them the ability to charge their customers different rates based on the service area each customer wishes to be able to communi- cate in. Currently, the only way to either determine what areas a particular group of users require or to change a user or group of users service area is by manually reprogramming either the subscriber unit or the fixed end system. This is not very cost efficient or convenient for the users or the service provider.

SOLUTION

THE PROBLEM

  The problem is that currently a service provider for either a Cellular system or a two-way Wide area Trunked communication system determines what service area they will allow each user or a group of users to operate in by manually programming the subscriber units and fixed end database. The way it works is that these types of systems have multiple RF sites or cell sites in which the subscriber units roam between. The hxed end controller has the capa- bility of controlling which subscriber unit(s) can oper- ate at any given site. Given that, the service pro- vider can limit what sites each user can use and therefore can charge each user a different rate based on how many sites the user requires to use. Other reasons could be that they may want to limit the number ofusers on certain sites due to limited chan- nel resources or want to prevent unauthorized users from operating at a given site. In order to allow this

  This problem can be solved by the methods described here. What this invention...