Browse Prior Art Database

ACKNOWLEDGMENT OF EMERGENCY ALARMS AND CALLS

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000007762D
Original Publication Date: 1996-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2002-Apr-22
Document File: 2 page(s) / 110K

Publishing Venue

Motorola

Related People

Ajazunnisa Nayeem: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

Radio users have the ability to establish emer- gency alarms and calls within a communication sys- tem. Dispatch operators can handle these emergen- cies through their console positions. A console position typically monitors several radio channels/ talkgroups, and typically sounds an audible alarm tone if an emergency alarm is received on any ofthe channels/talkgroups being monitored. It is possible for more than one emergency alarm to be pending on any specific channel/talkgroup, and a differentia- tion between these multiple emergencies should be displayed to the dispatch operator.

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M-LA Technical Developments

8

ACKNOWLEDGMENT OF EMERGENCY ALARMS AND CALLS

by Ajazunnisa Nayeem, Armando Vera, Arthur Fumarolo and Heidi Hattendorf

  Radio users have the ability to establish emer- gency alarms and calls within a communication sys- tem. Dispatch operators can handle these emergen- cies through their console positions. A console position typically monitors several radio channels/ talkgroups, and typically sounds an audible alarm tone if an emergency alarm is received on any ofthe channels/talkgroups being monitored. It is possible for more than one emergency alarm to be pending on any specific channel/talkgroup, and a differentia- tion between these multiple emergencies should be displayed to the dispatch operator.

  Since the emergencies being reported at the con- sole usually represent dangerous, and even life- threatening situations, it is important for the dis- patch operator to differentiate between emergency situations that are currently handled by other oper- ators, and those still needing attention.

designed to be loud and annoying, in order to cap- ture the attention of the dispatch operators. Unfortunately, because these alarm tones are annoy- ing, they may be extinguished (by a dispatch opera- tor) for the purpose of stopping the tones, even when the dispatch operator has no intention of actually taking responsibility for handling the emergency sit- uation. Consequently, the emergency remains active, but no warning tones are present to alert other dis- patch operators of the emergency situation. Other dispatch operators may erroneously assume that who- ever turned off the tones may be handling the emergency.

  Additionally, when several emergency alarms and/or calls occur simultaneously, an operator may elect to handle one of these emergency alarms or calls, but other operators may not know exactly which ofthe emergency alarms/calls is being handled. Con- sequently, operators do not know which emergen- cies are currently being handled, or by whom. In some cases, when multiple emergencies are reported on the same radio channel/talkgroup, dispatch oper- ators must listen to the audible conversation on the emergency channel/talkgroup to determine which of the multiple eme...