Dismiss
InnovationQ will be updated on Sunday, Oct. 22, from 10am ET - noon. You may experience brief service interruptions during that time.
Browse Prior Art Database

METHOD FOR INTERFACING THIRD PARTY BOARDS TO ADEPT SYSTEM

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000007815D
Original Publication Date: 1996-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2002-Apr-25
Document File: 4 page(s) / 197K

Publishing Venue

Motorola

Related People

Carl Davis: AUTHOR

Abstract

The Adept MV controller (Adept Technology, Inc.) is a high performance, general purpose motion controller built around the VME bus. The control- ler operates a real-time multitasking operating sys- tem developed by Adept Technology specifically for robot control. A powerful high-level programming language is tightly integrated into the system. Though this architecture provides many advantages, it lim- its the ability to add third party VME boards by the end-user ofthe system. This paper describes a tech- nique to add transparent support for third party dig- ital input/output boards without modi@ing the Adept OS.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 32% of the total text.

Page 1 of 4

8 -LA Technical Developments

METHOD FOR INTERFACING THIRD PARTY BOARDS TO ADEPT SYSTEM

by Carl Davis

ABSTRACT:

TECHNIQUE:

  The Adept MV controller (Adept Technology, Inc.) is a high performance, general purpose motion controller built around the VME bus. The control- ler operates a real-time multitasking operating sys- tem developed by Adept Technology specifically for robot control. A powerful high-level programming language is tightly integrated into the system. Though this architecture provides many advantages, it lim- its the ability to add third party VME boards by the end-user ofthe system. This paper describes a tech- nique to add transparent support for third party dig- ital input/output boards without modi@ing the Adept OS.

  Based on the architecture described above these elements are needed to successhtlly integrate a third party I/O board consist of

1. A driver which can interface with the I/O board. This routine will take care of low-level communi- cation over the VME bus. These drivers can be written in V+ since commands for accessing the VME bus and shared memory are included. This paper does not discuss how to write these rou- tines, since each board will require a different driver. The following calling syntax is used for the drivers used by the sample implementation (Listing I)-CALL signal(signum), GALL sig(sig- num, value), where Signum is signal identifier and value is logical input value. Drivers should also be optimized for performance because they will be called every time an input or output must be updated.
2. A range of software signals are set aside for use with the third party I/O board. The system I/O commands will access this set of signals when interfacing with the device. This technique relies on the fact that the Adept treats so8 signals exactly the same as hardware I/O. The AIM package is simply accessing a standard I/O which allows the developer to use the standard package without modification. This discussion will assume the address space is sequential.
3. Finally, the interface software which translates the information contained in the sofl signals into calls to the driver routines is needed. A very basic rou- tine would sequentially step through all possible addresses. For each address, the software calls the driver to check each input and set the correspond- ing sol? signal. Also, the so8 signals will be tested and the driver called to set the output based on the result. This software is given a dedicated time

ADEPT WSTEM ARCHITECTURE:

  The two basic Adept V+ commands that are important for a discussion of digital I/O are the SIG- NAL and SIG commands. The SIGNAL command is used to actuate a digital output, and the SIG com- mand is used to read a digital input. These com- mands can access the physical input and output sig- nals ofthe controller as well as a set of"soPt signals" supported by the OS.

  SoI? signals are digital I/O which do not repre- sent an actual physical link to the outside world....