Browse Prior Art Database

RADIO USER INTERFACE TRAINING

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000007824D
Original Publication Date: 1996-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2002-Apr-25
Document File: 2 page(s) / 118K

Publishing Venue

Motorola

Related People

Terry Mansfield: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Due to the large number of people using 2-way radio communications devices, there is a large vari- ation in the audio levels and other parameters (such as inflection and mouth-to-microphone distance) which influence the perceived audio quality. These parametric variations, when excessive, can result in customer dissatisfaction with the radio communica- tions system. Therefore, it is highly desirable to obtain uniform audio levels and quality horn each and every user.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 50% of the total text.

Page 1 of 2

MOFOR0L.A Technical Developments

RADIO USER INTERFACE TRAINING

by Terry Mansfield, Rick Rose and Mark Spiotta

PROBLEM SOLVED BY THE INVENTION:

  Due to the large number of people using 2-way radio communications devices, there is a large vari- ation in the audio levels and other parameters (such as inflection and mouth-to-microphone distance) which influence the perceived audio quality. These parametric variations, when excessive, can result in customer dissatisfaction with the radio communica- tions system. Therefore, it is highly desirable to obtain uniform audio levels and quality horn each and every user.

PRIOR ART:

  The primary means for unifying audio levels is through manual training of the subscriber unit users in the recommended operation of the radio equip- ment. Unfortunately, this approach applies one set of standards as well as guidelines to a group of peo- ple, each of whom may have different needs, voice levels, and inflections.

  Another approach uses an automatic level con- trol in the console equipment. This approach helps provide a uniform volume level to the dispatcher- which is particularly critical to dispatchers who use headphones, but does not impact the voice quality in the subscriber-to-subscriber loop (via either talk- around or a repeater). However, the root cause of the problem is not addressed: Get the user to pro- vide an optimum voice level into the subscriber radio. Until this occurs, we will continue to degrade the audio quality by providing sub-optimal levels to the voice coding algorithms. In addition, in analog sys- tems, the deviation level will either be clipped (for extra-loud voices) or too low, which degrades audio quality.

cial "training mode" in the subscriber radio and/or the radio infrastructure. The training mode permits the user to talk in the manner in which he/she is accustomed, and then hear his/her own voice back- just as another user would hear it. In this fashion, the user can experiment with speaking habit altera- tions (i.e. change the mouth/microphone distance, intonations, inflections, volume, etc.) and rapidly determine which changes help improve the perceived voice quality the most.

  Several training modes are possible, depending on the capabilities existing in both the subscriber radio and the infrastructure radio.

  The first training mode provides local, non- vocoded loopback capability in the subscriber radio only. The training sequence consists of the follow- ing steps:

1. Enter the training mode.
2. The user operates the radio in his/her cus- tomary personal manner-including mouth- to-microphone distance, normal voice levels- in the desired ambient environment.
3. The rad...